Crafts & Hobbies Information

Embroidery Designs Sewing


Denim is a twill weave and runs diagonally and any diagonal weave is difficult to control, whether you are attempting construction sewing or machine embroidery. Twills are designed to give the wearer ultimate wearing comfort by the natural "give" it has. That's why we all love our chinos & jeans! However, this comfort quality presents a real problem for machine embroidery enthusiasts.

It is essential to keep fabric "blocked" while cutting, assembling, and stitching either regular seaming or machine embroidery. From cutting out pattern pieces to hooping denim for embroidery, you will experience a challenge of keeping the fabric "blocked" squarely. If you're a quilter, you know exactly what blocking is. If you're not a quilter it simply means keeping the grain of the weave, in both cross & straight directions, straight or square.

Denim is difficult to block because of the diagonal weave and, generally, denim is a heavier weight than most other fabrics are. I recently stitched an ankle length, heavy, denim duster coat using a very large design down the front edge of the coat opening, near the hemline. This meant I had to keep the design running straight in 2 directions at once. The outcome could have been quite unsightly if I hadn't taken extra precautions to make sure the design was placed squarely and that the stabilizing was adequate to prevent the puckers and warping that result from the pull of a machine embroidery design while it is stitching.

Since I had chosen a rather dense assortment of designs to combine for a scene, I knew that I had a difficult, but not impossible, task. First I had to determine what would keep the twill from becoming distorted during the stitching. Second, I knew it would be next to impossible to hoop the coat - the denim was as heavy as any work jeans I've seen.

I immediately knew that I wouldn't be able to hoop the coat, therefore it was a matter of first stabilizing the denim then finding a way to create a method of hooping a backing that would hold up under a high stitch count design and remove easily when the stitching was completed. Given the factors I couldn't change - the weight of the fabric & the heaviness of the group of designs - I wanted to use a "formula" of layers which wouldn't create a stiff effect when all was done. The front edge of a coat does flip open - this could be considered a lethal weapon if one is not careful!

~ DESIGN PLACEMENT ~

The first problem to overcome - can you imagine the bulk of all this fabric when attaching the hoop to the machine! Since the bulk of the fabric must be to the left of the machine so as not to constrict the movement of the embroidery "arm" and hoop, the design had to stitched upside down! To accomplish this you simply flip the design/s first vertically then horizontally.

Using a printed image of the design and the plastic grid for the hoop, I decided exactly where I wanted to place the design. (Always stand about 3 feet away from the garment to make sure the design is where you want it! It's usually best to try it on & look in the mirror.) Since this was for my daughter I had to wing it!

~ PREPARING THE FABRIC OR GARMENT ~

I laundered the coat to shrink it to prevent any warping or puckering which would have happened after it was laundered the first time. Next I steam pressed the front of the jacket to its original flat state by applying Magic Sizing and heavy steam. Now the key here is the word press - not iron! If you iron (move the iron in any direction while bearing down) denim will be stretched and distorted.

After allowing the coat to dry completely after this process, and making sure of the design placement previously decided, I then applied the fusible medium tear away backing to the back side, using a dry iron set at the polyester setting, making sure that the backing straight grain was running with the coat cross grain. Again - press the backing not iron it. To avoid an armor look, I chose the soft tear away backing as the second layer which was placed straight grain to straight grain. A light spraying of 505 temporary adhesive was applied to keep it from shifting.

~ STABILIZING ~

My choice for the "hooping" backing was wonder solv - a water soluble, fabric-like stabilizer, which will support any number of stitches. I hooped a piece in my Brother jumbo hoop, which has a 5 X 12 inch stitch area. I then sprayed the wonder solv with a heavy coat of 505 spray.

I set the jumbo hoop on my Hoop Mate to insure that I could get the front edge of the coat straight with the curved edge of the hoop. Then, making sure that the hem edge was kept straight as well, I pressed the entire backed portion of the coat to the hooped wonder solv. I placed the plastic grid template over the "hooped" fabric to double-check the placement Whew - the worst part of the project was accomplished!

~ FINALLY! READY TO STITCH ~

After locking the hoop to the embroidery arm, I placed a sheet of web solvy on top to prevent the stitches from sinking into the denim. The first thing I stitched was the basting outlines in all three areas of the jumbo hoop. It takes a bit of time, but is well worth the effort. This secures the fabric/garment to the hooped backing helping to insure the least amount of movement during the actual design stitching.

I proceeded by stitching the top design first, then the bottom design and finally the center design. By moving around the hoop in this fashion you are preventing excessive pull in any one area, which can cause distortion of the fabric and unsightly puckering.

~ FINAL RESULTS ~

I'm happy to report that the entire scene was straight/square with the front and hemline edge of the coat, there were no puckers, no warping and no "off " outlines! The coat was no stiffer after the designs were applied than it was originally. My daughter now proudly wears a lighthouse to ocean-floor scene on the lower edge of this spring / fall weight coat!

Terry Carter is the webmaster and author of embroidery articles at embroidery designs by Thread Artist. He has an article about embroidery software for digitizing and lettering fonts at embroidery software. There is a free embroidery digitizing Tutorial at this web address - embroidery by Thread Artists. You can email Terry at this address - ThreadArtist@qx.net


MORE RESOURCES:
This RSS feed URL is deprecated, please update. New URLs can be found in the footers at https://news.google.com/news


Researching Your Family's History
Madison.com
Come learn how to dig into your family history and uncover stories that help you to understand where you come from and the ancestors who had an impact on your life. Lori Bessler will provide information on how to research your family using online ...



Madison Travel Circle presents Arts and Crafts Thailand
Madison.com
Discover the many arts and crafts of Thailand and the communities that make them with Lori Fleury. OTOP: One Tambon (Village) One Product was created for the late King Adulyadej of Thailand, to encourage village communities to improve local product ...



MADTech Series -- Social Media Analytics
Madison.com
We all know social media is important in spreading your reach. It's the new word of mouth— people referencing, referring, and occasionally recommending you or your product or service. But what are social media insights actually telling you and how can ...



MyCentralJersey.com

Finished!
MyCentralJersey.com
I started last week with three sweaters on the needles that were fairly close to finishing. I've already written about the Deborah Newton yoke sweater for which I ran out of aqua yarn. Then there was the Kiama sweater that I started last summer and ...



Fix-a-Flat Bike Tire Class
Madison.com
Machinery Row Bicycles hosts free, small group fix-a-flat tire classes every Tuesday from May to August. Classes are open to anyone wanting to learn. To participate, just show up at the shop and we'll provide all the tools. We do recommend bringing ...



Response Magazine

A Fourth-Quarter Dip, but Short-Form Billings Finish Best Year Since 2014
Response Magazine
Breaking a five-quarter winning streak, Kantar Media's fourth-quarter 2017 short-form DRTV media billings results show a $139.6 million (16.9 percent) year-on-year decrease, slipping to $684,293,900. Even with this disappointing finish — mainly due to ...



"Domesticated Threads II" Sewing Small Containers with Artist-in-Residence
Madison.com
Learn how to design and sew a small fabric wallet, cell phone case, lined Japanese style lunch bag, pencil case or other container. It's nice to take the first Domesticated Threads workshop so that you can incorporate embroidery into this project but ...



House Painting — Tips from a Pro
Madison.com
Learn how to freshen up your home with a new look. Get house painting tips at the Verona Public Library on Wednesday, May 16, from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Eric Welch, professional painter, will share tips and techniques for the do-it-yourself painter, including ...



How to Brew Beer At Home
Madison.com
Are you curious about brewing and want to learn the basics of brewing beer at home? This 2-hour beginner homebrewing class is the perfect place to learn! Join Ben Feifarek, owner of the Wine and Hop Shop in Madison, to learn the brewing beer process ...



MyCentralJersey.com

Links to free hat patterns
MyCentralJersey.com
This is a list of free hat patterns and links to patterns on mycentraljersey.com and other websites that you can use for In Stitches projects. Adult knitted hats for chemo caps or winter hats: Mock cable beanie, one of my designs · Pattern from "The ...


Google News

home | site map | Shell Art
© 2006