Crafts & Hobbies Information

Depression Glass Companies


Just before the advent of the Great Depression, more than a hundred companies manufactured glassware in the United States. At the end of the Depression, fewer than fifty percent of these companies remained in business. Of these companies, seven became major players in the production of Depression glass, and these seven companies utilized a little more than 90 patterns to decorate their wares. Indiana Glass, Hocking, Federal, U.S. Glass, Jeanette Glass, MacBeth-Evans, and Hazel-Atlas manufactured hundreds of thousands of pieces of this popular and inexpensive glass, creating a bright spot in the lives of everyday, working-class people during a grim epoch of American history.

Before Depression glass came along, colored and patterned glass existed, but only for the wealthy. Because the beautifully hued and intricately designed glassware of the times was hand-blown, and the cost of manufacturing such pieces proved prohibitive for most people, this type of glass was simply out of reach for many households. However, with the invention of mass-produced, machine-pressed glassware that produced colors and patterns - albeit ridden with flaws such as air bubbles and mold marks - a new versatility in glassware could be made available to households all over America. Because of this, even the poorest families could now have cheerful pieces from which to serve their meals, hold sugar, salt, pepper, and other condiments, contain candy, and more - even to shake their martinis, if they could scrape up the money for the bathtub-made gin!

Adam, Cherry Blossom, Iris and Herringbone, Sierra (Pinwheel), and Windsor make up some of the most popular and now-sought-after patterns produced by the Jeanette Glass Company from 1928 through the 1970s. From 1932 to 1942, Federal created such designs as the Sharon (Cabbage Rose), Rosemary (Dutch Rose), Madrid, and Columbia that fetch top-market prices today.

Anchor Hocking came into being when Anchor Cap and Closure merged with Hocking Glass in 1937, so when you see "Hocking" and "Anchor Hocking" you know you are looking at pre- and post-1937 pieces, respectively. Some of the patterns considered highly collectible today from Hocking include Coronation (banded rib), Fortune, Old Café, Princess, and Waterford. Anchor Hocking created such well-loved designs as the Manhattan (horizontal ribbed) design along with the Oyster and Pearl pattern.

Hazel-Atlas Glass Company introduced Florentine #2 (Poppy), Hairpin (Newport) and Moderntone, while MacBeth Evans brought American Sweetheart and Petalware onto the market.

These patterns touch on only a few of the most popular and sought after patterns that today's collectors seek - many more exist from these and other glass manufacturers to entice and fascinate avid Depression glass aficionados the world over.

Many of the glass companies - at least those that survived the Great Depression - maintain museums in which interested parties can learn much more about Depression glass and the businesses that supplied it. Credit must be given to these glass manufacturers for providing something simple and low-priced yet delightfully appealing to a grateful public at a time when such items were few and far between.

So when you admire a piece of Depression glass, there's a good chance that very same piece may have uplifted a family in what was an otherwise bleak time. And now you'll know when you see this prettily colored or clear and patterned glass, that it's much more than "just another pretty face!"

Until next time,

Murray Hughes
http://www.DepressionGlassSecrets.com

http://www.depressionglasssecrets.com/DPweb-articles/depression-glass-companies.html

If you enjoyed this article by Murray Hughes, then visit Depression Glass History now and enroll in the free Depression Glass course "The 5 Essential Steps To Becoming A Depression Glass Collector". For AOL Users: Depression Glass Companies


MORE RESOURCES:
This RSS feed URL is deprecated, please update. New URLs can be found in the footers at https://news.google.com/news


Researching Your Family's History
Madison.com
Come learn how to dig into your family history and uncover stories that help you to understand where you come from and the ancestors who had an impact on your life. Lori Bessler will provide information on how to research your family using online ...



Madison Travel Circle presents Arts and Crafts Thailand
Madison.com
Discover the many arts and crafts of Thailand and the communities that make them with Lori Fleury. OTOP: One Tambon (Village) One Product was created for the late King Adulyadej of Thailand, to encourage village communities to improve local product ...



MADTech Series -- Social Media Analytics
Madison.com
We all know social media is important in spreading your reach. It's the new word of mouth— people referencing, referring, and occasionally recommending you or your product or service. But what are social media insights actually telling you and how can ...



MyCentralJersey.com

Finished!
MyCentralJersey.com
I started last week with three sweaters on the needles that were fairly close to finishing. I've already written about the Deborah Newton yoke sweater for which I ran out of aqua yarn. Then there was the Kiama sweater that I started last summer and ...



Fix-a-Flat Bike Tire Class
Madison.com
Machinery Row Bicycles hosts free, small group fix-a-flat tire classes every Tuesday from May to August. Classes are open to anyone wanting to learn. To participate, just show up at the shop and we'll provide all the tools. We do recommend bringing ...



Response Magazine

A Fourth-Quarter Dip, but Short-Form Billings Finish Best Year Since 2014
Response Magazine
Breaking a five-quarter winning streak, Kantar Media's fourth-quarter 2017 short-form DRTV media billings results show a $139.6 million (16.9 percent) year-on-year decrease, slipping to $684,293,900. Even with this disappointing finish — mainly due to ...



"Domesticated Threads II" Sewing Small Containers with Artist-in-Residence
Madison.com
Learn how to design and sew a small fabric wallet, cell phone case, lined Japanese style lunch bag, pencil case or other container. It's nice to take the first Domesticated Threads workshop so that you can incorporate embroidery into this project but ...



House Painting — Tips from a Pro
Madison.com
Learn how to freshen up your home with a new look. Get house painting tips at the Verona Public Library on Wednesday, May 16, from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Eric Welch, professional painter, will share tips and techniques for the do-it-yourself painter, including ...



How to Brew Beer At Home
Madison.com
Are you curious about brewing and want to learn the basics of brewing beer at home? This 2-hour beginner homebrewing class is the perfect place to learn! Join Ben Feifarek, owner of the Wine and Hop Shop in Madison, to learn the brewing beer process ...



MyCentralJersey.com

Links to free hat patterns
MyCentralJersey.com
This is a list of free hat patterns and links to patterns on mycentraljersey.com and other websites that you can use for In Stitches projects. Adult knitted hats for chemo caps or winter hats: Mock cable beanie, one of my designs · Pattern from "The ...


Google News

home | site map | Shell Art
© 2006