Crafts & Hobbies Information

Gold Jewelry Hallmarking Secrets Revealed


We should be familiar with the BASIC hallmarks mentioned on the website. It might pay you to read them again, just to bring you up to speed and ensure you have grasped the principles. If you have not yet had the chance to read them please go to the website listed below.

Let's quickly remind ourselves where we should be regarding Hallmarks.

The first three marks mentioned before were:

1: The Makers mark

2: The Assay Office mark

3: The Quality mark

And that brings us to the last mark...

4: The Date stamp.

Please note that more mistakes are made with this mark than any other.

This is caused by two reasons.

The first: because 26 letters can only be used for 26 years (a different one for each year, although they did use italics or capitals for a change). So in order to extend their use, they changed the shape of the stamp mark itself.

One series of 26 years may use a Shield shape, while the next 26 years may use a square shape with the corners trimmed off. Go figure?

And second: because humans being humans, (and contrary to common belief, Jewelers are Human), a manufacturer who lived in Birmingham had to use one shape of stamp, while jewelers in London had to use another shape.

All very good, you say, until a jeweler who USED to live in London went to Birmingham to work and took all his old tools and stamps with him, and couldn't be bothered (they cost money) to buy a new set. So he used his old set....

Ahhh... Life is never simple.

However; and in general terms, if all else fails use common sense.

As London was the Largest and most common stamp, you may find a Birmingham mark with a slightly wrong date stamp, although the date YEAR mark should be the same.

By using all of the marks together and taking into account the wear and look of the item - plus what it is, you should get fairly close to accurate.

If your still not sure, get a written valuation done with your local professional Jewelry Appraiser, and use that piece of paper as fact.

Even though YOU know, they are going through the same process of 'Dating' it's still a little confusing. Plus it's not the only form of Dating I get confused with...? And my plastic eyeglass doesn't help at all....

Look out for these tips next time you're spying with your eyeglass.

HALLMARKING TIPS #1:

In Circa 1821 the Leopard's Head Hallmark became 'Uncrowned' In Circa 1891 Queen Victoria's head was no longer used in Hallmarking. The major point is to use ALL of the Hallmarks, not just the date letter. Also check the style of an item, as this could give a clue to the period.

HALLMARKING TIPS #2:

As a general rule, Hallmarks should be assessed by going from the 'Big Picture' to the 'Small Picture' or the particular date in question.

For example: Date the article within a 25 year time span first, as this can be calculated from the overall 'SHAPE' or style of the stamp mark (Shield or Oval etc). Then go to the actual 'Year' stamp mark.

Remember, these can sometimes be wrong, but if we are in the ballpark, so to speak, we won't be too far out.

It is interesting to note that the expression 'Circa' or 'c' actually means 'around'...

Silver imported into England carried the 'F' mark (for Foreign) between 1883 - 1904.

HALLMARKING TIPS #3:

It is helpful if we can remember some of the more important changes to Hallmarking and just how that effected Quality.

For example: The quality of Hallmarked Gold can give us a clue regarding its age. Items of 22ct stamped with the 'Lion passant' were made up to 1844. After that date items were stamped 22ct with a 'Crown' hallmark.

HALLMARKING TIPS #4:

UKHM stands for the United Kingdom Hall Marks and has been in existence since 1300. Yes... 1300!

The basic marks are:

The Assay Mark which indicated the 'Guarantee of Quality'.

The Origin Mark which shows WHERE it was Assayed.

The Duty Mark to confirm 'Tax' had been paid.

The Maker's Mark to indicate the company or individual who made the item.

The Date Mark based on the letters of the Alphabet, changing each year.

The Assay year was NOT a Calendar year as it began (as for London) in May. That means it covered TWO Calendar years.

There are several other SPECIAL REPORTS available through our eMail-on-Demand subscription box at the website, so please take some time to visit.

There is a timely warning on Security issues. It's good advice, plus there is some great tips on Investing in Jewelry, Insurance guidelines and other notes on selling, Hallmarking tips etc, and they are being added to all the time.

And the best bit is they are FREE....

Thank you for taking the time to read this special report. If you thought it interesting, useful or found it helped you in any way I would appreciate your comments via email at the address shown below.

This is my personal email address and I read every comment - good or bad.

Alternatively: why not pass it on to a friend. I'm sure you can think of someone who might benefit from this useful information. Treat it as doing me a big favor. I will certainly appreciate it.

Thank you. As usual....
Take care and watch the road.
Kind regards.
David Foard F.G.A.A.
President gemologist/valuer at the Online Jewelry Appraisal Center.

P.S. There are many other complimentary Reports available to you at our website, or if you haven't yet done so, you may like to subscribe to our email-on-demand Newsletters - the Antique Jewelry Guide - full of Hints - Tips - Secrets and Articles in every issue.

About The Author

David Foard is retired ("Ha..." he laughs). He is working harder now than at any time in his life, especially over the 30 years he spent in the Antique Jewelry Trade as a qualified gemologist and member of the Valuers Council. Now he concentrates on the three 'R's of 'Reading' Ritin' and re-ritin articles, courses and producing free reports and information at his website.

Get all the info now by going to http://www.online-jewelry-appraisals.com and follow the links at the Online Jewelry Appraisal Center.

gemmo1@jewellery-antiques.com


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