Fishing Information

The Value of Observation


The beginner must learn to look with eyes that see. Occurrences of apparently little importance at the moment may, after consideration, assume proportions of great value. The taking of an insect, for instance, may mean nothing more than a rising trout; but the position occupied by this fish may indicate the position taken by others in similar water.

The flash of a trout, changing his position preparatory to investigating the angler's fly, will frequently disclose the spot occupied by him before he changed his position; and, later on, when the fish are not in the keenest mood for feeding, a fly presented there accurately may bring a rise. The quick dart up-stream of a small trout from the tail of a pool is a pretty fair indication that a large fish occupies the deeper water above; it indicates just as certainly, however, that the angler has little chance of taking him, the excitement of the smaller fish having probably been communicated to his big relative.

The backwater formed by a swift current on the upstream side of a boulder is a favourite lurking-place of brown trout. I was fishing such places one day, and found the trout occupying them in rather a taking mood. In approaching a boulder which looked particularly inviting, and while preparing to deliver my fly, I was amazed to see the tail and half the body of a fine trout out of the water at the side of the rock.

For a moment I could not believe that I had seen a fish-the movement was so deliberate and I came to the conclusion that it was fancy or that a water-snake, gliding across the stream, had shown itself. Almost immediately, however, I saw the flash of a trout as he left the backwater and dashed pell-mell into the swift water at the side of the boulder.

Down-stream he came until he was eight or ten feet below the rock, when, turning sharply and rising to the surface, he took from it some insect that I could not see. Up-stream again he went, and shortly resumed his position in the dead water, showing half his body as he stemmed the current at the side of the rock. Once more this performance was repeated, and I knew I had stumbled upon an interesting experience.

Hastily measuring the distance, hoping to get my fly to him before some natural insect might excite him to give another exhibition of gymnastic feeding, I dropped it about three feet above him, and, contrary to my usual method of retrieving it as it floated past the up-stream side of the boulder, I permitted it to come down riding the top of the wave, when the same flash came as the trout dashed after it.

The fish could be plainly seen almost directly under the fly. As it reached the rapidly flattening water below the rock, he turned and took it viciously, immediately darting up-stream again. He was soundly hooked, however, and I netted a fine fish lacking one ounce of being a pound and a half. My experience heretofore had been that if a fly were placed a yard or so above this point and allowed to float down to the rock a feeding fish would rush forward-often as much as two feet-and take it, immediately turning or backing into his position again. I had assumed from this observation when the fly passed the rock or backwater without a rise it should be retrieved and another try made.

This fish satisfied me, however, that when really feeding, or when inclined to feed, trout may be lured comparatively long distances by inviting-looking morsels. Either he did not decide to take the fly until just as it was passing him or else he liked the exercise of the chase. In any event, he was not peculiar in his habit, because four more fish were taken in the same manner the same day.

In most cases when the fly is cast above a boulder lying in swift water (which I consider, under certain conditions, one of the best places to look for brown trout) it will be taken as it approaches the rock, the trout darting out and retiring immediately to avoid being caught in the swifter water on either side of his stronghold. But if it is not taken, and is permitted to float down with the current, it may bring a response.

It was a somewhat similar observation which prompted the practice and, I must say, rather dubious development of what some of my friends are pleased to call the "fluttering" or "bounce" cast. This cast is supposed to represent the action of the fluttering insect, the fly merely alighting upon the water, rising, alighting again, repeating the movement three or four times at most; finally coming to rest and being allowed to float down-stream. It rarely comes off, but when it does it is deadly; and, for the good of the sport, I am glad but when it does it is deadly; and, for the good of the sport, I am glad that it is difficult, though sorry, too, for the pleasure of accomplishing it successfully is really greater than that of taking fish with it.

The cast is made with a very short line-never over twenty-five feet-and the fly alone touches the water. The action of the fly is very similar to that produced by the method known as "dapping," but instead of being merely dangled from the rod, as is the case when "dapping," the fly is actually cast. It should be permitted to float as far as it will after its fluttering or skipping has ceased.

The beginner practising the cast will do well to cast at right angles to the current, and he should choose rather fast water for his experimenting. The speed of the water will cause the fly to jump, and the action it should have will be the more readily simulated than if the first attempts are made on slow water.

----------------------SIDEBAR-----------------------

Older fly fishing classics contain a wealth of knowledge for the beginner fly fisher as well as the experienced angler.

The preceding article was an excerpt from: "Secrets To Fishing The Dry Fly - Vol II" by G.M. LaBranche (1914)

--------------------END SIDEBAR-------------------

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Don Berthiaume has uncovered fly fishing tips and techniques that were almost lost forever. To discover more about fly fishing, and claim your free, 4-part mini-course, visit this site: Fly Fishing Tips


MORE RESOURCES:
This RSS feed URL is deprecated, please update. New URLs can be found in the footers at https://news.google.com/news



Omaha World-Herald

Fly-fishing obsession yields state records for silver carp
Omaha World-Herald
A never-ending hobby, Eric Einspahr says, is the best way to describe his addiction to fly fishing. “It kind of takes over your life," he says. The Lincoln angler brought buddy John Vrtiska of Cedar Creek into the fly -fishing fold last spring. They ...



Jamestown Sun

Lake trout nirvana found on northern Saskatchewan fishing trip
Jamestown Sun
KAMATSI LAKE, Saskatchewan—We'd been exploring a new part of the lake, catching lake trout with just enough regularity to keep things interesting, when Peter Howard suggested we try a nearby shoreline point at the mouth of a narrows we'd been fishing ...

and more »


The Columbus Dispatch

Outdoors | Lake Ontario salmon fishing challenging, rewarding
The Columbus Dispatch
OLCOTT, N.Y. — Although the late-afternoon air was not warm for mid-July, beads of sweat began to form on Roger's brow as he tangled with a fish of yet-to-be determined size, weight and identity. It became obvious the fighter was not a featherweight, ...
Outdoors column: Salmon, trout are prizes of Great Lakes fishingMankato Free Press
Woods & Waters: Salmon fishing heats up on Lake OntarioThe Livingston County News

all 3 news articles »


Charleston Post Courier

Outdoors Calendar: July 22, 2018
Charleston Post Courier
The final Fishing for Miracles King Mackerel Tournament will be held Aug. 16-18 out of Ripley Light Yacht Club. Registration and the captain's meeting begin at 5 p.m. on Aug. 16 with fishing on Aug. 17 and Aug. 18. The entry fee is $350 per boat. There ...

and more »


Duluth News Tribune

Warm weather, hot fishing can go together
Duluth News Tribune
"Sweating bullets" seems to be a common theme around the area lately. We have certainly been utilizing the canopy top on the Lund to keep the sun off our customers during the hot afternoon hours. Cooler clothing, hats, sunscreen and sunglasses have ...



The Grand Junction Daily Sentinel

Having a reel good time
The Grand Junction Daily Sentinel
"We realized there was smallmouth bass in this fishery in 2013," said Eric Gardunio, CPW aquatic biologist, adding the fish were likely in the reservoir starting in 2008. "We were looking for ways to limit the number of smallmouth bass here in Ridgway.".



Reuters

Israel to reopen Gaza terminal, extend fishing on Tuesday if quiet holds
Reuters
JERUSALEM (Reuters) - Israel will reopen Gaza's main commercial crossing and expand its fishing zone on Tuesday if a lull in cross-border tensions holds after a truce with the enclave's dominant Palestinian Islamist group Hamas, the Israeli defense ...

and more »


Duluth News Tribune

Lake Vermilion guides get 100 kids out for a day of fishing
Duluth News Tribune
And so started the ninth annual Take a Kid Fishing Day on Wednesday, sponsored by the Lake Vermilion Guides League. Shaffer and her friend, Jon Ross,13, also of Aurora, were in Johnson's boat, among 100 kids who got to fish with 45 local guides and ...



Scranton Times-Tribune

Father, son craft custom fishing rods, flies at Archbald shop
Scranton Times-Tribune
Kozlowksi has been custom making fishing rods for 20 years, first as owner of M & J Custom Rods, before taking ownership of Custom Tackle and Bait, which shares space with Fazio's Archery, in January 2014. He first got interested in making rods after ...

and more »

Google News

home | site map | Ocean Photography
© 2006