Fishing Information

Stories From the Heartland (Pt.1)


Every River Tells a Story

The next time you begin a journey or fishing expedition on one of your favorite rivers or streams, take the time to look at the surroundings (I mean REALLY look), and listen closely, as each one has it's own unique story to tell.

As we begin our journey, we may see a typical farmer out in the field plying his trade, doing his best to put food on your table and eke out an existence that was handed down to him over generations.

Coming around the bend, we notice the billowing white smoke of a local power plant churning out electricity to make your life comfortable and secure. As we turn our head to look at something perhaps more aesthetically pleasing on the opposite bank, we notice that elusive red fox we've been hoping to see for the longest time on this particular waterway.

Watching the vixen run back and forth delivering food to the underground shelter of her cubs tells you that they are around 2 weeks old, and you can't help but think to yourself that wildlife go about the business of living not much unlike that of each and every one of us on Earth. Every living thing needs to eat the food and drink the water that this planet provides in order to survive.

Perhaps the hardest facts to consider are those of how we, as humans, go about existing in this environment.

The river provides drinking water to the local residents, who in turn pay for this service by going to work at the plant that treats the water to make it palatable and healthy enough to drink in the first place. Like the fox and her cubs upstream, we too are characters in one long story of life along the river.

Let's take a closer look at a few of the characters involved as our journey continues:

With the sight of the power plant just a blur on the horizon, we come upon a neighbor of ours.

This man (or his predecessor) had long ago cut down his woods opposite mine, and is on his riding mower cutting his grass to within an inch of its life. This lawn exudes a bright green color that can only come from a bucket of chemicals designed for such. His mission for himself on the land, from our perspective, might be expressed as 'clear, drain, mow, spray, control. For him the story of a property owner features an actor at war with his surroundings, which can be beaten and shaped and maintained by constant vigilance. A piece of property such as his can only be described as a great place to practice with a pitching wedge before holing out a 25 footer on the putting green, all the while considering this to be a piece of recreational paradise on earth. The neighbor fully believes in his heart that he has the best that nature provides, and uses it to his full advantage.

Around yet another bend in the river we come upon the work crew that is clearly pouring every ounce of energy they can muster into the project at hand.

Their story says a person can draw a living from nature without harming it. One can move steadily through the workday and through one's life, chopping and digging, sawing and clearing, earning an honest buck and sleeping the good tired sleep of the farmer or stone mason. They wish nature no harm, and believe they have enough knowledge about proper and improper behavior in the field. Like our forefathers, they are forging ahead towards a bright future among fresh new land, only much more efficiently with their expensive trucks, backhoes and graders.

The end of a reflective day is nearing as we tie up the canoe at the modest dock we've fashioned at the edge of our 3 acres of wetlands and natural prairie with a simple pathway made of stone leading up to the house. Our guiding story is that of someone with conservationist knowledge and instincts, who is willing to stand up to his neighbors for those goals. Our aesthetics embrace woods and wildlife. Thoughts turn easily to how we may better protect the species of fish we are after and the quality of our water.

Like a sudden bolt of lightning in the night, a knock comes at the door and we are snapped backed to reality in an instant.

Two men from a local governmental unit have come to explain the details of their latest plan to dredge and straighten the portion of river in front of our house. It is explained that our woods and the neighbor's property get flooded during times of high water, and a very generous consortium has offered to pay for the work to its completion.

They go on to mention something about mosquito control and such, but we're not really paying attention at this point, as our attention is fixed on the sight and sound of some birds working feverishly to build a nest in the tree just beyond the door.

In each case stated above, the actors are guided by personal stories directed by specific attitudes and behaviors.

Attitudes perhaps prescribed to by our own personal environmental heroes: golfers, loggers, naturalists.

Spontaneously and without conscience we go about our life standing by our beliefs and traditions.

I'll leave it to all of you to decide if there is a moral to the story this river has to tell.

I'm certain your favorite stream has one of its own, unique in nature but common in its entirety.

Until next time, I'll leave you with this to ponder:

"The nation behaves well if it treats the natural resources as assets which it must turn over to the next generation increased, and not impaired, in value." ~Theodore Roosevelt

By: Mike Clifford
HeartlandOutdoorsman.Com

Mike is the owner/operator of HeartlandOutdoorsman.Com This most comprehensive website offers a unique look into the Great Outdoors. Photo Contests, discussions and reports from across the country fill out a great online experience.


MORE RESOURCES:
This RSS feed URL is deprecated, please update. New URLs can be found in the footers at https://news.google.com/news


The Pew Charitable Trusts (blog)

Fishing Subsidies Are Speeding the Decline of Ocean Health
The Pew Charitable Trusts (blog)
More than 1 billion people worldwide depend on seafood as a main source of protein, and about 100 million people rely directly on fishing for their income, yet according to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), 90 percent of ...



Chico Enterprise-Record

North state fishing report
Chico Enterprise-Record
FEATHER RIVER: Flows from Oroville Dam jumped to 5,000 cfs a few days before Monday's salmon opener, which could pull in fresh fish from the ocean. Striper fishing is slow again, with a few keepers and shakers being caught. Shad fishing is slow.
Lake Lanier Fishing Report: Striper fishing starting to improveGainesville Times
Oregon Fishing Forecast - July 19, 2018Portland Tribune
DNR Fishing Report: 07/19/2018Traverse City Record Eagle
UpperMichigansSource.com -Toledo Blade -AberdeenNews.com
all 21 news articles »


WDBJ7

Hometown Adventures: Fishing
WDBJ7
“I just been fishing all my life, my mother's dad, my pawpaw got me into fishing….I've been loving it ever since, and it's grown and grown all my life,” Patsell said. He took us to the old Strawberry Banks campground area because he had some luck ...



BGR

Man catches shark, shark gets eaten by an even bigger fish, man does not catch shark
BGR
Fishing in the ocean can be a pretty interesting experience, especially when you accidentally hook a shark. That's what happened to a fisherman aboard a charter fishing boat late last week, and all things considered he took it pretty well. The shark ...

and more »


Palm Beach Post

South Florida Weekly Fishing Report - July 19, 2018
Palm Beach Post
The snook fishing has also been good in the Jupiter area along the Intracoastal Waterway all the way to the inlet where they are spawning. Anglers working the dock lights and mangroves in the ICW are having good luck. Best baits have been live shrimp ...



Fishing report: Gray wins Gloucester Boys and Girls flounder tournament
Daily Press
The Gloucester Boys and Girls Club flounder tournament was won by Bradley Gray with a stringer weight of 12.26 pounds. Brian Hogge took second with 12.01 pounds. Hogge also won the award for the single heaviest flounder with a 5.84-pound fish.

and more »


Newsday

Island's mixed-bag fishing is good for kids
Newsday
None of that means there aren't any fish to catch. In fact, mixed-bag bottom fishing for less glamourous species including black sea bass, porgies, triggerfish and red hake at this time of year can offer steady action within a reasonable ride of most ...



The Patriot Ledger

Veterans hit the seas for the annual fishing trip
The Patriot Ledger
More than 150 local disabled veterans were treated to a three-hour fishing outing, lunch and entertainment at Quincy Yacht Club on Wednesday. QUINCY -- As Michael Dansereau leaned back in his chair, face to the sun as he breathed in some salt air, the ...

and more »


AL.com

Fish at Alabama Deep Sea Fishing Rodeo much bigger
AL.com
As anglers await the Friday morning cannon blast that will start the 2018 Alabama Deep Sea Fishing Rodeo, one thing remains clear: If you want to catch the biggest fish in the Gulf, you've got to wet your line in Alabama. More on the big fish in a ...



Oakdale Leader

Fishing Report 07-18-18
Oakdale Leader
Depending on where I'm fishing and the species of fish that I'm catching, I might keep a few. Some anglers have become conditioned to letting the fish they catch go and have a hard time understanding why anyone would keep a fish. Most of those same ...
Alan Liere's fishing-hunting report for July 19The Spokesman-Review
Fishing reportMonroe News Star
Fishing report: Lake Jacomo tourney yields multiple 5-plus pound fishKansas City Star
Evening Observer -The Ledger
all 26 news articles »

Google News

home | site map | Ocean Photography
© 2006