Medicine Information

Cetyl Myristoleate Seperating Fact From Fiction


I am a strong believer in Cetyl Myristoleate for the treatment of arthritis. For the last three years I have been researching and writing about Cetyl Myristoleate. I am constantly searching for new research and contact and interview every doctor I can find that works with it. The purpose of the article is to evaluate the claims made about Cetyl Myristoleate on the myriad of web sites that sell it. It you want more information on the research that documents the effectiveness of Cetyl Myristoleate then do a search for my article, "Cetyl Myristoleate: Science or Speculation".

Cetyl Myristoleate is an Immune Modulator. This is a tough question. We do not have any medical research yet that documents that it is an immune modulator. Many doctors believe that it is based on observations of their patients. Some people respond so well it appears that the benefits go beyond joint lubrication and a decreases in inflammation. Base on these results some doctors theorize that it is helping to correct some peoples immune systems. While this sounds wonderful it is a bold statement to make. I am not ready to call it an immune modulator.

Cetyl Myristoleate is a cure for arthritis. This is not only a bogus claim it is a lie. Not only is it a lie it is illegal to make that claim. If you are at a web site that makes this claim, leave, this person is not the kind of person you want to do business with. They need to be reported to the Federal Trade Commission.

All you need is one 15 or 20 day protocol. There are several companies that make this type of claim. You will notice that the companies that make this claim are among the most expensive. I believe that they use this to justify their high prices. Who would pay this price on a regular bases. While the double blind studies show that many people start finding relief in this amount of time, they were all short term studies and did not evaluate how long the results lasted. Every doctor I have talked to has disagreed with this statement. The people who find relief from Cetyl Myristoleate usually start seeing good results by the two week mark. But they continue to improve for the next two to four weeks. Almost everyone who discontinues use finds that with in a couple of weeks their symptoms begin to return. But they also find that once they max out their benefit they need much less to maintain that level of relief.

Cetyl Myristoleate helps 97% if the people who use it. I have seen this claim several times. It is simply not true. The research does not back it up and neither do those doctors who use it in practice. The percentage is closer to 70%. Of course the percentage changes depending on the type of arthritis you have. With nearly 100 types of arthritis nothing is going to work well on every type.

Cetyl Myristoleate is an anti aging agent. This is a powerful marketing tool. Every one wants to look and stay young. There is no research to back up this claim. Some of the doctors I have talked to believe it base on their observations. I have over a dozen family members and friends who take CM faithfully and none of us look younger. Yet almost all of us feel younger because we can now do things again that we had to give up because of our arthritis. If this is what they are talking about I concur. But if they are claiming it will make you younger or keep you from aging I think they are stretching it.

It is necessary to take digestive enzymes with Cetyl Myristoleate. This is a hard one. I personally do not think everyone does. Some people have a hard time digesting fats. If taking CM causes you stomach upset then you need to take a digestive enzyme. Make sure it has lipase because it is the enzyme that digests fat.

Cetyl Myristoleate will help you grow new cartilage. This is another unfounded claim. There is nothing in CM to help you grow cartilage. Once the inflammation is down then your body may find it easier to replace the cartilage damaged by the inflammation.

Will Cetyl Myristoleate help me with my arthritis? I would like to end the article with the question most ask of me. The answer is I do not know. All I can say is the research and my experience and the experience of the doctors I have talked to says that there is a 60% to 70% chance. Be reasonable about your expectations. CM is not going to repair bone damage, remove calcium deposits or repair other types of damage created by your arthritis. If you decide to try it do not pay too much. There is no need to pay $50, $80, $100 dollars or more. There are several good products in the $20 to $50 range. If the first bottle does not work for you do not waste your money on a second.

About The Author

I am a two time survivor of cancer. The first cancer took a kidney. Therefore I cannot take any arthritis medication. I began to research alternative options of treating arthritis. I found a natural supplement called cetyl myristoleate that has kept me pain free for 4 years now. I have been researching, publishing and speaking on cetyl myristoleate ever since.

painfree56@lycos.com


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