Medicine Information

Sinusitis: Sinus Infection Deals a Corporate KO


Sinusitis and Sinus Infection Starts with a Little Sniffle

Yes, I hear it too. A simple sniffle in a distant cubical. No big deal. But wait. There went another. Before long the office uproars in a virtual canon of sniffing, and it is more alarming then musical. Little do they know that a little sniffle might indicate the onset of one of the most expensive corporate costs common to most businesses - sinus infection and sinusitis -unless the business is prepared to nip it in the bud early that is.

Sinusitis and Sinus Infection

Sinusitis is an advanced sinus infection, usually beginning with the post-nasal drip from sniffing during cold season, when weather changes, or during allergy attacks. The head has four nasal cavities which, if blocked by inflammation or mucous, will breed bacterial growth and eventual sinus infection and sinusitis.

Depending upon the severity of the blow, a sinus infection or sinusitis could affect your employees for periods ranging between 3 weeks and several months. Many attacks occur several times a year. Because a sinus infection may develop and lead to sinusitis at any time, businesses must not overlook the corporate cost. Be prepared.

Corporate Cost of Sinus Infection and Sinusitis

$5.8 billion a year is not what the American businesses want as an annual expense. But most businesses might as well add sinusitis or sinus infection to its balance sheet, they have been paying for it in recent years and it will keep coming back - kind of reminds you of Rocky Balboa.

Why should businesses be so concerned about sinusitis and sinus infection? Here are a few numbers they might want to analyze. Reports indicate that between 31 and 32 million Americans are affected by sinusitis or sinus infection each year, resulting in about 18 million healthcare visits. These visits, of course, are part of company health plans.

Not convinced yet? This may not seem like that much of a business expense until you add the expense of sinusitis and sinus infection performing a virtual KO of your office. Sinusitis and sinus infection knocks out professionals for an average of 4 days per year. Not to mention the affect sinusitis and sinus infection have on the productivity of those who come to work affected by sinusitis and sinus infection. The affect is similar to those suffering from sinus allergies in that about one-third of affected employees feel that these sinus problems make them less effective at work. That is a costly corporate hit.

Symptoms of Sinus Infection and Sinusitis

Corporations should keep their guard up, other wise one sniff could turn out to be a fatal financial blow. Here are symptoms to be mindful of:

  • Signs of congestion (sniffing, nose-blowing)
  • Soreness anywhere in the head, including the face and neck
  • Sneezing, ear ache, throat pain, coughing
  • Headaches
  • General fatigue, weakness, soreness

8 Tips to Preventing a Corporate KO.

You may not be surprised that these preventions are simpler and cheaper than just letting sinus infection and sinusitis take their course in your office.

  • Stock Up. Give the admins a small stock of decongestants and pain relievers to keep the employees free from symptoms while at the office - make sure they are daytime medicines.
  • Cover a Prescription Plan. Invest in a good health plan that provides for doctor's visits and prescriptions. Prescriptions cost a lot less than more serious treatment.
  • Keep it Clean. Regular cleaning of carpets and fabric chairs in addition to all surfaces (keyboards, counters and rails, desks, etc) will save money in the long run. You'd be surprised how many sinus infection and sinusitis attacks occur because of dust, mold, and colds from office bacteria.
  • Drink Up. Water, that is. Employees are going to be able to flush out normal bacteria when drinking water.
  • Party Alcohol-free. Sinus infection and sinusitis often develops from irritation when alcohol is consumed, even at work parties or functions.
  • Designate an Outdoor Smoking Area. Not only will smoke stick to everything indoors, irritating the nasal cavities, but keeping an area outdoors will also centralize the smoke.
  • Invest in Air Conditioning, Air Filters, or Humidifiers. Spending money getting air regulation is cheaper than spending lots of money on a sick office of people.
  • Encourage Frequent Hand Washing. You don't want bacteria to spread all ever your office like a forest fire. Clean hands make a happy office.

    Now you can erase $5.8 billion from your debit column.

    Joe Miller is specialist in online advertising at 10x Marketing. For more information on sinus-infection or sinusitis please visit Xlear.com.


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