Medicine Information

Bextra and Vioxx Withdrawal Spurs Price Increase Among Rivals


The market for painkillers is huge. People don't like pain and inflammation, and last year Americans spent nearly $4 billion on just two of them - Vioxx and Bextra. Those two drugs, part of a family of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs known as COX-2 inhibitors, were withdrawn from the market recently amid concerns that they can cause heart attacks and strokes. The loss of these two drugs to the marketplace is huge, as they were the two largest sellers in a fairly narrow field. COX-2 inhibitors differ from traditional non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in that they inhibit production of the COX-2 enzyme that causes inflammation but do not interfere with COX-1, the enzyme that protects the stomach lining. Patients who use these drugs are thought to suffer less from internal discomfort and bleeding than those who took traditional anti-inflammatories, such as naproxen and ibuprofen.

With the withdrawal of these two blockbusters, patients with chronic pain, such as arthritis sufferers, are now going back to older painkillers, such as Mobic, Motrin, and Relafen. Since the more popular Vioxx and Bextra are no longer available, these older drugs are enjoying a resurgence in popularity, and sales are up across the board. So, it seems, are their prices. A recent study by a popular consumer publication shows that prices of some three dozen anti-inflammatory medications have gone up since Vioxx was withdrawn from the market in September 2004. The increases average about ten percent. Why have the prices of these older, established medications all gone up at once?

The answer, simply, is that the pharmaceutical companies have raised the prices because they can. The market for drugs is wildly competitive, and manufacturers are constantly seeking any advantage they can find in the marketplace. The sudden withdrawal of two of the most popular and profitable medications has provided a rare opportunity for manufacturers to increase both sales and prices at the same time, as the drug makers know that patients must switch to another medication. It's good for their stockholders, but bad for those who suffer from pain.

Will the high prices last? Probably not. Pricing of highly competitive medications tends to be volatile. The prices may stay up in the short term, but other medications may be introduced soon, or Bextra or Vioxx may be returned to the market. The introduction of other drugs will restore more competition to the market, and prices may drop once again. The market for painkilling drugs is a bit of a crazy one, and patients should simply exhibit some, well, patience.

©Copyright 2005 by Retro Marketing.

Charles Essmeier is the owner of Retro Marketing, a firm devoted to informational Websites, including Bextra-Info.net, a site devoted to the withdrawn drug Bextra and StructuredSettlementHelp.com, a site devoted to structured settlements.


MORE RESOURCES:
This RSS feed URL is deprecated, please update. New URLs can be found in the footers at https://news.google.com/news


Forbes

Precision Medicine Success Hinges On Diagnostics' Clinical Utility
Forbes
The companion diagnostic plays a significant role in precision medicine. As a predictive biomarker assay, often in vitro, it is linked to a drug's indication, but can also be tied to multiple indications and drugs. Companion diagnostics provide ...



Medical News Today

How does complementary medicine impact cancer survival?
Medical News Today
Complementary and alternative medicine has seen an incredible spike in popularity over recent decades. It is now more widely available in the United States than ever before. The interventions, such as herbs, vitamins and minerals, traditional Chinese ...

and more »


Undark Magazine

When 'Concierge Medicine' Came to Town, I Had Some Questions. I Still Do.
Undark Magazine
To some, the whole concierge medicine concept — in any context — sounds like a revolutionary model of health care delivery that enhances the doctor-patient relationship. To others, it looks like an elitist program whereby scarce medical resources are ...



Inverse

Doctors Worry as Cancer Study Reveals Dark Side of Complementary Medicine
Inverse
In a paper published Thursday, a team of researchers at Yale School of Medicine present evidence that cancer patients who receive complementary medicine — like supplements, traditional Chinese medicine, homeopathy, naturopathy, yoga, acupuncture, ...

and more »


Radio New Zealand

Solomons government says medicine shortage is easing
Radio New Zealand
The Solomon Islands government says a shortage of essential medicines is easing. It said an urgent shipment arrived in this country this past weekend, which allowed medical centres to restock. Doctors had complained of an acute shortage of essential ...



Healthcare IT News

Next-gen precision medicine: Consumerism, EHR integration, SMART on FHIR
Healthcare IT News
Precision medicine is something of a Holy Grail in healthcare: Being able to deliver personalized treatments to individual patients to best cure specific ailments is the ultimate in healthcare. While precision medicine is still fairly nascent today ...



The Star Online

Dr Dzulkefly: Statement about traditional medicine is fake, not issued by Health Ministry
The Star Online
PETALING JAYA: Dr Dzulkefly Ahmad has clarified that a statement on integrating herbal medicine into mainstream healthcare being circulated on social media is not from the Health Ministry. He said the Ministry did not issue the statement titled ...



Citizens Voice

Cutting edge of 18th century medicine on display at Denison House
Citizens Voice
That was what soldiers wounded in battle and ordinary people faced during life-saving medical procedures in the late 18th century, according to Jeff Smith, a historical re-enactor who specializes in Revolutionary War-era medicine. “These people were ...



Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News

Liquid Biopsy, Key for Precision Medicine
Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News
The last 10 years have seen enormous progress in both the understanding of cancer as a disease, as well as the development of targeted therapies, with an unprecedented number of new drugs approved for cancer treatment by the FDA and EMA.



Washington Post

China's push to export traditional medicine may doom the magical pangolin
Washington Post
“Traditional Chinese medicine should be a healing force for good, but not at the expense of animal cruelty or the extinction of species,” said Iris Ho, wildlife program manager at Humane Society International. China's decision to ban the ivory trade at ...


Google News

home | site map | Dr. Thad Thomas
© 2006