Medicine Information

Understanding Tumescent Liposuction


Tumescent liposuction is done using a local aesthetic. A large volume of saline solution containing the aesthetic and a drug called "Epinephrine" is injected directly into the areas where there are excessive fatty deposits. Epinephrine is important in the surgical process because it shrinks capillaries and minimizes blood loss. Minor sedation may be required for those who feel a little nervous about the surgery; however the patient is usually completely conscious during the surgery.

Benefits of Having Tumescent Liposuction

? Fewer skin irregularities

? Less bleeding

? Reduced bruising

? Faster recovery

Procedure

A small incision is made in the skin, allowing the tube connected to a vacuum type machine to suck up the fat. The tumescent method uses smaller cannulae than that of any other type of liposuction which results in less bruising or bleeding. An elastic compression garment is worn to help the skin contract and heal. This helps to sculpt the bulging areas of the skin and help to achieve more attractive contours.

There are risks associated with having any type of surgery. Tumescent liposuction is a very safe procedure with very few side effects. If the following types of side effects occur they are usually easily corrected.

? Skin irregularity

? Lumpiness

? Dimpling

? Loose skin

? Infections

Tumescent Liposuction Recovery

Recovery time varies dramatically from person to person. Many patients are able to walk out of the office without assistance and get back to a regular routine within a few days. It takes almost six weeks for any scar to begin to soften and a full year to be complete.

A patient may feel a little numbness in the area that has been treated because the local anaesthesia remains in the tissue for twenty-four hours or more after surgery.

Most patients will usually only experience minor discomfort after the numbness wears off.

Most patients are generally alert and able to function; they do not experience nausea and grogginess associated with general anaesthesia.

The sooner a patient can begin to move around, the faster the healing progresses.

Physical exercise is not recommended until at least a week after having the procedure.

Tammy Corbett is an abdominoplasty weight loss consultant and author of several articles on the importance of weight loss programs . She is currently writing more articles for her website http://www.abdominoplasty-info.com/. See original article at http://www.abdominoplasty-info.com/tumescent.html.


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