Medicine Information

Prevent Foot Problems When Walking


Americans are on the go. According to a NSGA Survey, 71 million American adults are exercise walkers, making walking the top sport in the United States. Taking steps daily to improve health will help with America's obesity epidemic. Sixty five percent of Americans are overweight, which is linked to diabetes, heart disease, arthritis and some types of cancer. Walking an extra 2000 steps a day is equivalent to walking a distance of 1 mile and to burning 100 calories. Burning an extra 100 calories a day is equivalent to losing about 10 pounds in a year.

The American Podiatric Medical Association teamed with Prevention Magazine to name the "12 Best Walking Cities in the U.S." The cities were examined based on their crime rate, air quality, mass transit, historic sites, museums, parks and gyms. The top 12 cities were San Francisco, San Diego, Honolulu, Washington, DC, San Antonio, El Paso, St. Louis, Madison, Chicago, Philadelphia, New York and New Jersey.

National campaigns, health practitioners and even major corporations are encouraging Americans to walk more. Unfortunately, many sedentary individuals who start walking programs quickly develop foot problems. Almost sixty million Americans have foot problems and many develop them after beginning a new exercise routine. A foot injury can take weeks, even months to heal and many will gain more weight during this healing period. Preventing these problems through education will keep Americans walking.

1. Buy a shoe made for walking. Make sure the shoe has enough stability and support. If you can fold the shoe in half, it is too flexible. Make sure the shoe has enough room at the toes and is fitted well at the heel.

2. Start on flat surfaces. Do not start a walking program walking on hills or stairs.

3. Start with a short distance. Stick with that distance for a week. If you are pain free and injury free, increase the distance the following week.

4. Start with an easy pace. Increase your pace gradually.

5. Choose soft surfaces. Walking on a track or a trail will decrease the impact on your feet and legs. Cement can be a particularly hard surface to walk on.

6. Limit your time on the treadmill. Treadmills can contribute to the development of foot problems. Start with the treadmill flat and at a slow pace. Slowly increase your pace each week. Increase the incline after you have reached a comfortable pace.

7. Stop if you feel foot or ankle pain. Don't try to walk through the pain.

8. Examine your feet. Look areas of rub or irritation the first few weeks of your walking program and then again after trying new shoes or socks. Moleskin can be placed on areas of irritation to help decrease friction. Do not use bandaids on these areas.

9. Consider wearing orthotics. Individuals with flat feet may need inserts for their shoes. When buying inserts, look for sport othotics, as opposed to cushioned insoles. A more rigid insert will offer more support. Custom orthotics can be made by a podiatrist if necessary.

10. Avoid cotton socks. Synthetic socks decrease friction, prevent excess rubbing and don't absorb moisture. Your local running store or sports store should carry a variety of new high-tech socks for walking.

Consult your podiatrist if you start to develop pain when walking, or consider a visit before embarking on your new walking program.

Christine Dobrowolski is a podiatrist and the author of Those Aching Feet: Your Guide to Diagnosis and Treatment of Common Foot Problems. To learn more about Dr. Dobrowolski and her book visit
http://www.skipublishing.com/ or http://www.northcoastfootcare.com.


MORE RESOURCES:
This RSS feed URL is deprecated, please update. New URLs can be found in the footers at https://news.google.com/news


Forbes

Medicine and Dentistry: Undoing an Illogical 150-Year Divide
Forbes
It's no secret that medicine and dentistry have evolved an unnatural professional separation that is helpful to no one and often causes unnecessary suffering on the part of patients. But we're in a moment—driven by our greater understanding of the ...



PharmaTimes

Mirati joins CR UK's Stratified Medicine Programme
PharmaTimes
Mirati Therapeutics has joined Cancer Research UK's Stratified Medicine Programme, bringing new investigational treatment options to eligible patients with advanced lung cancer. The partnership will make Mirati's experimental drug, sitravatinib ...



Healthcare IT News

Center for Connected Medicine polls top health systems about 2019 priorities
Healthcare IT News
The Center for Connected Medicine polled IT executives across 38 health systems for its 2019 Top of Mind survey. Cybersecurity continues to be the biggest concern across the industry, with telehealth and interoperability not far behind. Those topics ...

and more »


AAFP News (blog)

Bustling Clerkship Shows Family Medicine Is Never Boring
AAFP News (blog)
Not only was family medicine the first specialty I was ever interested in, it was my first third-year clerkship in medical school, too. Although I started medical school thinking family medicine was the specialty for me, it wasn't until my clinical ...



OncLive

Dr. Borgen on Precision Medicine in Breast Cancer
OncLive
The TAILORx trial, which was discussed at the 2018 ASCO Annual Meeting, is a perfect example of precision medicine making its way into this space, according to Borgen. Data from this trial suggested that by applying the precision medicine concept in ...



News3LV

Pulmonary Medicine
News3LV
Pulmonary Medicine. OptumCare Lung and Allergy Care. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or “COPD” is a chronic inflammatory lung disease that causes obstructed airflow from the lungs. Symptoms include breathing difficulty, cough, mucus production ...

and more »


Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis

MRI scans shows promise in predicting dementia
Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis
In a small study, MRI brain scans predicted with 89 percent accuracy who would go on to develop dementia within three years, according to research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of California San Francisco.
Researchers Use MRI to Predict Alzheimer's DiseasePRNewswire

all 36 news articles »


Stanford Medical Center Report

Stanford Medicine magazine reports on ways digital technology is transforming health care
Stanford Medical Center Report
Four programs highlight how Stanford Medicine uses digital technology to fill in gaps in care: An emergency room physician uses tablet computers to train community health care workers in underserved areas of Haiti and India; radiologists transformed ...



Mylan recalls batches of blood pressure medicine in US
Reuters
(Reuters) - Mylan NV said on Tuesday it would recall certain batches of blood pressure medicine valsartan in the United States after they were found to contain a probable cancer-causing impurity, the latest recall amid heightened safety concerns globally.

and more »


KRVS

Medicine Ball Caravan: November 20, 2018
KRVS
We've got sound to heal you on Tuesday's MEDICINE BALL CARAVAN on KRVS (11am-noon Central Standard on 88.7FM locally or krvs.org) with recent selections from Paul McCartney, Zuider Zee, Sunflower Bean and The Record Company. Also: familiar ...


Google News

home | site map | Dr. Thad Thomas
© 2006