Medicine Information

The Truth about C Reactive Protein and Cholesterol Lowering Drugs


You might disagree, but hear me out on this...

The drug companies know what they want you to think. They want you to think that the only reliable predictor for heart disease is an elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol level, and the best way to decrease your risk to take "statin" drugs such as Zocor and Lipitor. Cholesterol-reducing medications are among the highest-grossing pharmaceutical products ever, so drug companies want to lead you to their medications. But an elevated LDL-cholesterol level is not the only predictor of heart disease. It's not even the best predictor--that honor goes to a little known test that looks for elevated levels of C-reactive protein.

What is C-reactive protein?

C-reactive protein is produced by the body during times of inflammation. Doctors are not exactly sure why some people have elevated C reactive protein and others have normal levels, but they do know that high C reactive protein is linked to higher rates of heart disease, stroke, heart attack, and sudden cardiac death.

Traditional doctors agree that a test for C-reactive protein is a better measure of a person's risk for heart disease than cholesterol. The New England Journal of Medicine reported in November of 2002 that elevated C reactive protein predicts cardiovascular problems better than elevated LDL-cholesterol. The American Heart Association agrees.

How Is Elevated C Reactive Protein Determined?

The test to determine C-reactive protein levels is quite simple. A blood sample is taken, and the sample is analyzed in the laboratory. It's a test that's neither expensive nor invasive.

Even though doctors agree that C-reactive protein is such a powerful predictor for heart disease, the simple test is not often offered to patients. Why? They don't ask for it. Commercial advertising (supported by pharmaceutical companies who make money from lowering people's cholesterol levels) leads patients to ask their doctors to prescribe cholesterol-lowering statin drugs. They rarely ask about C-reactive protein tests and remedies because it's not a big-money business.

What Home Remedies Treat High C Reactive Protein?

Drug companies that sell statin drugs know that they could lose money if people start worrying more about their C-reactive protein levels than they do about their LDL-cholesterol levels. They are quick to point out that studies show that the same drugs used to lower cholesterol will also lower C-reactive protein. However, these drugs are both expensive and dangerous. Muscle reactions have left patients severely disfigured, and even physicians are questioning the wisdom and efficacy of widespread use of statin drugs.

Happily, natural healing offers many ways to keep C-reactive protein levels in the healthy range. These methods can be used to lower elevated C reactive protein, or to maintain good heart health. Even better, natural methods for reducing C-reactive protein have been proven by scientists to be as good as or better than drug therapy at combating C-reactive protein.

Diet--Healthnotes Newswire reported the conclusions of one study that showed that making several positive changes to one's diet could significantly reduce C-reactive protein levels. Adding plant sterols, insoluble fiber, soy protein, and almonds to the low-fat, vegetarian diets of test subjects helped reduce C-reactive protein levels by 28 percent more than a control group fed a low-fat, vegetarian diet.

Other studies have found links between increased consumption of whole grains and reduced C-reactive protein levels. These studies show that subjects who ate more simple carbohydrates had higher C reactive protein levels than subjects who ate more complex carbs.

Supplementation--Vitamin and mineral supplements have also shown to be an inexpensive, effective weapon against C-reactive protein.

Niacin--Niacin is a B-complex vitamin that works so well to lower cholesterol and C-reactive protein that it is regulated by the FDA and available by doctors in prescription strengths. Consumers can also buy high-quality B-complex vitamins, which have many other benefits, from any health food store.

Coenzyme Q10 and Vitamin E--Supplementing with vitamin E will reduce your C-reactive protein levels and enhance your health. Scientists have recently proven that combining vitamin E supplementation with coenzyme Q10 is even more effective, and can reduce C-reactive protein levels by as much as 30 percent.

Conclusions

It's still a good idea to make the diet and lifestyle changes that will lower your LDL-cholesterol levels. Reducing your intake of trans and saturated fats will help you live a longer life. If you're concerned about your risk of coronary disease, though, focus on you C-reactive protein levels. Ask your doctor for a blood test to determine your level of C-reactive protein. If it's high, talk to your physician about using diet and exercise, along with nutritional supplementation, to lower your C-reactive protein levels and your risk of heart disease.

References

"Comparison of C-Reactive Protein and Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Levels in the Prediction of First Cardiovascular Events." Paul M. Ridker, M.D., Nader Rifai, Ph.D., Lynda Rose, M.S., Julie E. Buring, Sc.D., and Nancy R. Cook, Sc.D. The New England Journal of Medicine. 347:1557-1565, Nov. 11, 2002.

"Inflammation, Heart Disease and Stroke: The Role of C-Reactive Protein." http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=4648

"Dietary Changes Can Reduce Cholesterol and C-Reactive Protein as Much as Medication." http://www.newhope.com/news.cfm?news=1355.

Dan Ho is editor of both Nutritional Supplement Info Spotlight, and Beat Your Health Condition which offer unconventional and unique solutions for common health issues. Claim your FREE subscription to his newsletter now at Nutritional Supplements Info Newsletter.


MORE RESOURCES:
This RSS feed URL is deprecated, please update. New URLs can be found in the footers at https://news.google.com/news


Financial Times

Scientists develop electronic 'smart skin' for sports and medicine
Financial Times
Electronic “smart skin” devices are being developed to monitor the biochemistry of sweating sports players, the health of stroke patients and the heartbeat of sick babies, researchers told the American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting ...
Japanese researchers develop ultrathin, highly elastic skin displayEurekAlert

all 28 news articles »


Rudaw

Patients protest medicine shortages at UN in Erbil
Rudaw
Tens of protesters gathered in front of the UN compound in Erbil on Monday. Photo: Rudaw TV. ERBIL, Kurdistan Region – A small group of people suffering from cancer, thalassemia, and other illnesses gathered on Monday in front of the UN compound in ...

and more »


KFDI

Flus, cold and cavities: How cold medicine can affect your kids teeth
KFDI
INDIANAPOLIS -- During this cold and flu season, dentists want you to take extra steps when giving cold and cough medicine to your children. Dentists at Indiana University Health report many of the liquid medications are chock full of sugars, which end ...

and more »


Healthcare IT News (blog)

Penn Medicine CISO: 3 Strategies every security team should have
Healthcare IT News (blog)
After all the cybersecurity threats and events in the last 12 months, infosec teams should focus on these priorities as the craft strategies into the future. By Dan Costantino. February 19, 2018. 09:08 AM. Share. cybersecurity threats. The information ...



Forbes

Is Gaming Technology 'Medicine's New Frontier?'
Forbes
The Internet is rife with articles about the potentially harmful effects of gaming. Psychologists and parents have been debating the pros and cons of the issue for decades now—namely whether video games promote violence, social isolation and obesity ...



Standard Speaker

New medicine effective in fighting high cholesterol
Standard Speaker
The new drug is expensive, about $14,000 a year before insurance for the twice-monthly self-injected medicine. Blum said insurance companies typically will cover the drug for patients who can't reach their cholesterol goals with the highest tolerated ...

and more »


Stuff.co.nz

Popular Arthrem medicine linked with potential harm to liver
Stuff.co.nz
Medsafe is advising members of the public taking the dietary supplement Arthrem of a potential risk of harm to the liver. A widely used supplement to relieve joint pain could harm the liver - and some users have needed hospital care, Medsafe warns ...
Warning of potential harm to liver associated with the natural medicine ArthremNew Zealand Doctor Online

all 6 news articles »


Campbell Medicine hosts first Research & Educational Symposium
Campbell University News
The Jerry M. Wallace School of Osteopathic Medicine was occupied with more than 100 resident physicians, medical students, faculty and staff during the first Research & Educational Symposium, a collaboration of five hospital sites with approximately 20 ...



How Modern Medicine Changed the Way People Die
Knowledge@Wharton
Death is as old as time itself. But it has also changed in modern times, with technology prolonging life, social media making death a shareable event, and most people checking out of this world in hospitals and nursing homes instead of at home. Haider ...



HuffPost South Africa

Local Black Women Breaking Down Barriers In Medicine
HuffPost South Africa
From the youngest black female hospital CEO to the country's first black female neurosurgeon — young women in medicine are trailblazing. These mbokodos, all in their thirties, are as inspirational as they are aspirational. And today we're celebrating ...


Google News

home | site map | Dr. Thad Thomas
© 2006