Medicine Information

Interactive Technology in Healthcare Education


Healthcare professionals are under pressure to remember, utilize and absorb vast amounts of new or changing information in increasing volume. This surge has led to new and improved computer-based tools for many healthcare activities and to an explosion in the marketplace of tools used in instruction and education of healthcare workers. This article explains the use of interactive technology in healthcare and how this benefits instruction and education of healthcare professionals.

Digital systems that capture images from documents, 35-mm slides, physical samples or specimens, or virtually anything that the camera lens can see, is found in interactive technology. In healthcare, transmitting these images to computers with simple devices or software that will allow the display and integration of educational material into the training environment is easily accommodated.

The method for delivering these images or documents, usually via PowerPoint presentations, photography, videotape or audio presentations can turn a standard Windows PC into a dynamic, interactive, teaching tool. Depending on the type of training environment needed, interactive presentations can be found in the use of liquid crystal displays, large plasma displays, rear projection systems or even whiteboards. Educators can now tailor their courses to their audience's expectations and needs using any number of these presentation forms.

Effectiveness of interactive learning systems is largely dependent upon the type or form of delivery used in combination with software that is easily used by both novice and expert users. Smaller systems will use a pen or stylus vs. a computer and a mouse where larger systems may use elaborate videoconferencing systems where many participants can be in the virtual classroom at the same time. Many healthcare organizations already utilize small and large types of communication systems routinely in the delivery of quality, high-tech healthcare to patients and their community. Adapting this equipment or having it serve dual purposes is an easy and cost-effective transition.

The era of the blackboards and chalk dust is now a memory for most of us. Interactive technology tools permit the educator to draw on, write on, and annotate data right on the screen as part of their dynamic presentation. In addition, the educator can now annotate their presentation and then save, print and even distribute by email, the contents of the class session to all participants.

The mobility that interactive technology gives the educator in the virtual classroom lends itself to unlimited types of uses and methods for delivery of high quality, interactive, sessions. Participants, too, benefit from easy access to the sessions, improved and more accurate note-taking that can be used later for study and reference. This all leads to greater retention of the learning objectives and enhanced or improved application in the field once the participant returns to the office or department.

Healthcare professionals should look for educators and learning systems that combine ergonomics with interactive technologies that integrate use the user of free text, annotation, images and video clips with the traditional printed materials. Transitions between screens or programs, linking to the Internet and class sessions, downloading or printing of the course materials and saving of files or information for future classes or reference use should be easy and simple to use. The presentation and delivery of the educational material should be efficient and easy to use and tailored to use by both healthcare professionals that have varying levels of technological skills.

Regardless of whether healthcare workers are new to the workplace or seasoned professionals, the learning systems used should assist them with learning new skills, procedures, diagnostic techniques and terminology. Communication between healthcare workers in both local and distant communities is on the rise and the use of interactive technology enables the participants to collaborate and share critical data and information.

Interactive technology can also benefit the bottom line and reduce costs formerly associated with travel or staffing and resources to send workers to local, regional or national meetings. Interactive presentations and systems can also attract and hold the participants interest and attention, enhancing their learning and retention gained from the course(s).

It is no wonder, then, that interactive technology has gained such a strong and prominent position in the education of healthcare workers. Healthcare workers looking for either online, distance or local training should evaluate the presentation and delivery systems used in order to maximize their learning experience.

PUBLISHING RIGHTS:
You have permission to publish this article electronically, in print, in your e-book or on your website, free of charge, as long as the author's information and web link are included at the bottom of the article and the article is not changed, modified or altered in any way. The web link should be active when the article is reprinted on a web site or in an email. The author would appreciate an email indicating you wish to post this article to a website, and the link to where it is posted.

Copyright 2005, M. A. Webb. All Rights Reserved

Michele has 20+ years experience in oncology healthcare, including Cancer Registry management. You can learn more about cutting-edge learning tools and opportunities by visiting her WeTrainU blog, Cancer Registry and online training site (eStudy4U).


MORE RESOURCES:
This RSS feed URL is deprecated, please update. New URLs can be found in the footers at https://news.google.com/news


Financial Times

Scientists develop electronic 'smart skin' for sports and medicine
Financial Times
Electronic “smart skin” devices are being developed to monitor the biochemistry of sweating sports players, the health of stroke patients and the heartbeat of sick babies, researchers told the American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting ...
Japanese researchers develop ultrathin, highly elastic skin displayEurekAlert

all 28 news articles »


Healthcare IT News (blog)

Penn Medicine CISO: 3 Strategies every security team should have
Healthcare IT News (blog)
After all the cybersecurity threats and events in the last 12 months, infosec teams should focus on these priorities as the craft strategies into the future. By Dan Costantino. February 19, 2018. 09:08 AM. Share. cybersecurity threats. The information ...



Forbes

Is Gaming Technology 'Medicine's New Frontier?'
Forbes
The Internet is rife with articles about the potentially harmful effects of gaming. Psychologists and parents have been debating the pros and cons of the issue for decades now—namely whether video games promote violence, social isolation and obesity ...



Standard Speaker

New medicine effective in fighting high cholesterol
Standard Speaker
The new drug is expensive, about $14,000 a year before insurance for the twice-monthly self-injected medicine. Blum said insurance companies typically will cover the drug for patients who can't reach their cholesterol goals with the highest tolerated ...

and more »


Stuff.co.nz

Popular Arthrem medicine linked with potential harm to liver
Stuff.co.nz
Medsafe is advising members of the public taking the dietary supplement Arthrem of a potential risk of harm to the liver. A widely used supplement to relieve joint pain could harm the liver - and some users have needed hospital care, Medsafe warns ...
Warning of potential harm to liver associated with the natural medicine ArthremNew Zealand Doctor Online

all 6 news articles »


Campbell Medicine hosts first Research & Educational Symposium
Campbell University News
The Jerry M. Wallace School of Osteopathic Medicine was occupied with more than 100 resident physicians, medical students, faculty and staff during the first Research & Educational Symposium, a collaboration of five hospital sites with approximately 20 ...



How Modern Medicine Changed the Way People Die
Knowledge@Wharton
Death is as old as time itself. But it has also changed in modern times, with technology prolonging life, social media making death a shareable event, and most people checking out of this world in hospitals and nursing homes instead of at home. Haider ...



HuffPost South Africa

Local Black Women Breaking Down Barriers In Medicine
HuffPost South Africa
From the youngest black female hospital CEO to the country's first black female neurosurgeon — young women in medicine are trailblazing. These mbokodos, all in their thirties, are as inspirational as they are aspirational. And today we're celebrating ...



Analyst Initiates Coverage on Regenerative Medicine Biotech, $70 Target More than Triple Current Price
Streetwise Reports
Cantor analyst Elemer Piros Ph.D. wrote, "We believe that PolarityTE can revolutionize the field of regenerative medicine. The company achieved previously unseen results with its SkinTE autologous cell product in wound healing, demonstrating flawless ...



Front Page Africa

Why Is Liberian Health System Struggling With Modern Day Medicine?
Front Page Africa
Corruptions which includes, misappropriate used of funds, irrational used of resources and the failure of auditor to report the actual case if there is any because they negotiate with said administrator/s for little of nothing leaving the majority with ...

and more »

Google News

home | site map | Dr. Thad Thomas
© 2006