Medicine Information

New Company Helps Another Medical Condition Become: "Acceptable" Dinner Conversation


Recently once taboo subjects like plastic surgery have become acceptable dinner conversation. Medical conditions are no longer whispered to friends, but have instead become part of the dinner table conversation with full blown discussions on Botox, erectile dysfunction and the feared colonoscopy. However recently there is a new kid on the block, well maybe not so new, it's actually plain old heel pain. You might ask why is this happening? Why is it so important now? After all heel pain for the most part won't kill you.

The answer is heel pain and specifically "plantar fasciitis can be extremely disabling - affecting work, leisure and social activities" according to Luke D. Cicchinelli, DPM, Eastern Carolina Foot & Ankle Specialists. Heel pain can really make ones quality of life miserable and lead to bigger problems at work and at home.

The conversation around the dinner table is only reflecting the bigger trend with which doctors are already familiar, which is that heel pain, specifically plantar fasciitis is on the rise. "More people are suffering and consequently more people are looking for help from friends, doctors and the Internet. There is a great deal of sometimes incomplete and sometimes contradictory information and unfortunately no quick fix or magic pill," according to Daniel Marein-Efrón, President of Heeling Solutions, www.heelingsolutions.com a company focused on helping patients and their doctors resolve heel pain through education and non-invasive techniques. A variety of factors including the obesity epidemic, the aging of baby boomers, the arrival of high heel wearing women into middle age and the weekend warriors playing basketball and training for marathons, are all contributing to the increase which is making doctors take a second look at how they treat plantar fasciitis.

In the May 2004 issue of Foot & Ankle International, the official publication of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) reveals that "The disorder (plantar fasciitis) is not managed in a consistent way. Rather, there appears to be a large amount of variation in the way that these patients are managed," however, one thing is very clear as described in the May 2004 New England Journal of Medicine which states that plantar fasciitis should first be treated with "patient-directed, low-risk, minimal-cost interventions." "The issue is that the information is not presented in a clear logical manner that can be easily customized to an individual's needs and foot type," says Mr. Marein-Efrón, "The Heeling Solutions R.E.S.C.U.E. Program is the first easy to understand comprehensive program that doctors give patients as a reference to treat the condition." Sufferers can use the video at home at their own pace to make sure that they are following their treatment program without the need for multiple visits. It's in-depth FAQ with doctors helps open the lines of communication, by educating people with the basic knowledge they need to more effectively work with their professional healthcare provider.

Daniel Marein-Efron is a former plantar fasciitis sufferer and President of Heeling Solutions LLC http://www.heelingsolutions.com . Mr. Marein-Efron has been involved with a variety of entrepreneurial businesses through his consulting company DMEX Consulting LLC.


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