Photography Information

Bracketing and How To Use Tt Correctly...


What Is... Exposure Bracketing

Exposure bracketing is a simple technique professional photographers use to ensure they properly expose their pictures, especially in challenging lighting situations.

When you expose for a scene, your camera's light meter will select an aperture / shutter speed combination that it believes will give a properly exposed picture.

Exposure bracketing means that you take two more pictures: one slightly under-exposed (usually by dialing in a negative exposure compensation, say -1/3EV), and the second one slightly over-exposed (usually by dialing in a positive exposure compensation, say +1/3EV), again according to your camera's light meter.

The reason you do this is because the camera might have been 'deceived' by the light (too much or too little) available and your main subject may be over- or under-exposed. By taking these three shots, you are making sure that if this were ever the case, then you would have properly compensated for it.

As an example, say you are taking a scene where there is an abundance of light around your main subject (for example, at the beach on a sunny day, or surrounded by snow). In this case, using Weighted-Average metering, your camera might be 'deceived' by the abundance of light and expose for it by closing down the aperture and/or using a faster shuter speed (assuming ISO is constant), with the result that the main subject might be under-exposed. By taking an extra shot at a slight over-exposure, you would in fact be over-exposing the surroundings, but properly exposing the main subject.

Another example would be the case where the surrounding might be too dark, and the camera exposes for the lack of light by either opening up the aperture and/or using a slower shutter speed (assuming ISO is constant), then the main subject might be over-exposed. By taking an extra shot at a slight under-exposure, you would in fact be under-exposing the surroundings, but properly exposing the main subject.

Now, most digital cameras have auto exposure bracketing, meaning that if you select that option before taking your shot, the camera will automatically take three shots for you: one which it thinks it has perfectly exposed; a second one sightly under-exposed; and the third one slightly over-exposed.

When should you use exposure bracketing? Anytime you feel the scene is a challenging one (too much highlights or shadows) as far as lighting is concerned, e.g. sunsets are usually better taken slightly under-exposed so use exposure bracketing there, or whenever you want to be sure you don't improperly expose a fabulous shot.

Remember, you are not using film anymore, so there are really no wasted shots (unless you are severely constrained by the size of your storage media).

Digital Dodging & Burning

Should you delete the extra shots right away? No, if storage permits, keep all three shots until you get home and upload them to your PC and into an image editing software, such as Photoshop. By using the layers functionality of Photoshop (or similar functionality of another image editing software), you can load all three shots into different layers and then carefully erase the under-exposed or over-exposed part of one or more layers to end up with a final shot where both the main subject and the surroundings are properly exposed!

This Photoshop functionality allows you to shoot in very extreme lighting situations where there are many parts in different intensity of light and shadows such that you are losing details in the highlights and shadows. In this case, you might need more than two extra shots to obtain details in the different parts. Without moving the camera (a tripod is essential here), take as many shots as you need, exposing for the different parts you want details to be visible. Then you would load them all up into Photoshop, each into its own layer, and by erasing the under- and over-exposed parts in each layer (granted, this equivalent of film 'dodging' and 'burning' can be a very tedious and challenging task in itself, but done properly it can be well worth the effort), you can end up with an 'impossible' shot where every part of the cave is properly exposed.

Used judiciously, exposure bracketing is a simple technique that can ensure proper exposure of a difficult lighting situation. Make sure you get a camera with good manual Bracketing control

Canon PowerShot S70 - Bracketing control


MORE RESOURCES:
This RSS feed URL is deprecated, please update. New URLs can be found in the footers at https://news.google.com/news



The New Yorker

The Best New Yorker Photography of 2017
The New Yorker
This was a year of political upheaval and creative flourishing, of societal reckonings and moments of light relief, and The New Yorker's photographers were on hand to capture it all. Whether through on-the-ground coverage or finely crafted portraiture ...



USA TODAY

National Geographic 2017 Nature Photographer of the Year winners
USA TODAY
A photo of an orangutan crossing a river in Indonesia's Tanjung Puting National Park is the top image from National Geographic's 2017 Nature Photographer of the Year contest. The photo, titled “Face to face in a river in Borneo,” was captured by ...

and more »


The Independent

In Pictures: The Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2017
BBC News
An owl dangling precariously from a branch has scooped the overall prize of this year's Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards. Out of the 3,500 entries, Tibor Kercz won the overall prize with his series of images showing an owl losing its footing and ...
Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2017: Little owl falling of branch beats amorous bears to top spotThe Independent
Comedy Wildlife Photography 2017 awards pictures are funnier than ...Metro
Animal Magic: 2017 Comedy Wildlife Photography AwardsCBBC Newsround
Evening Standard -Mirror.co.uk
all 13 news articles »


New York Times

The Odd, Otherwordly Glow of Fred Herzog's Photography
New York Times
Just down the road from where I live, a store is trying out a new retail marriage: pricey eyewear and photography books. Its patron saint ought to be Ralph Eugene Meatyard, who was an optician and a photographer, but his books, as far as I could make ...



Race, gender, and flash photography
OUPblog (blog)
The cover of Flash! shows a smiling African-American woman, who holds a Graflex Speed Graphic camera. Clamped to the camera is a flash gun in the form of a thick column, topped by a flash bulb filled with crumpled aluminium foil, and a reflector shield ...



Washington Post

Photography series explores mothers and daughters, and their relationships around the world
Washington Post
Through photography, Rania Matar could see that her experience growing up as a woman was very similar to that of her daughters, despite their generational and cultural differences. She grew up in Lebanon during a civil war; she was raising her children ...



Fstoppers

Google Announces Three New Photography Apps | Fstoppers
Fstoppers
Have you ever wished that your phone would do more with the photos and videos you take? Google has announced the first installment of "appsperiments:" Storyboard (Android only), Selfissimo! (iOS and Android), and Scrubbies (iOS only). These ...

and more »


Digital Trends

EyeEm's new Custom platform connects you with photographers for ...
Digital Trends
The mobile photo app that mixes a social photo platform with stock photography is launching new ways to find the perfect photo and new options for photographers to earn some cash. On Friday, December 15, EyeEm launched Custom, a collective group of ...

and more »


Adorama

How to Use Graffiti Art to Improve Your Street Photography
Adorama
Before graffiti (or street art) was widely appreciated by onlookers and practiced by underground artists around the world, it was considered simple and thoughtless vandalism. Fortunately, majority of the world has caught on and taken notice of the ...


Google News

home | site map | Seashell Photography
© 2006