Science Information

Secrets of The Mathematical Symmetry of Nature and Patterns of Erosion


As scientists and theorists study patterns, design, chaos, complexity they often turn to nature for examples and there is plenty of examples in nature too. The stripes on a zebra, patterns on a butterfly, spider webs, leafs on a tree, scales on a fish, seashells, brain waves, muscle structure, texture of granite, spider webs, Earth cycles, waves on the ocean, wind flow, clouds in the sky, Rainbows, Solar System, structure of a meteorite and even DNA itself.

One pattern of nature we often do not discuss is the patterns of erosion, which we can see better from an airplane, satellite photo, from valley looking up at a mountain or from top a mountain looking down below. Recently on Mars we see the patterns of erosion suggesting previous water flows.

http://www.astrobio.net/cgi-bin/h2p.cgi?sid=479&ext=.pdf

We see such erosion patterns on Titan, which most certainly believed to be caused by liquid methane. Such images have caused a stir in the scientific community as well as space enthusiasts.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk_news/story/0,...1395978,00.html

The patterns of the landscape so similar to those on Earth with rivers, lakes, coastlines that one has to wonder if patterns of erosion are not known quantities coming from a planned design? Although how can this be? In Stephen Wolfram's "A New Type of Science" he describes starting out with simplistic mathematical equations and then watching the patterns emerge. We know that in our complex and chaotic environments we see that the simplest components such as the atoms and molecules, which make up everything are simple in structure and preciseness.

Predicting patterns is not as difficult as it seems really if we start at the beginning and look forward rather than look at the now and try to figure the 'how'. Is it possible to have nearly the same patterns of erosion in more than one place, planet or region. Many researchers believe this is not only possible, but most likely a reality. They say no two fingerprints are the same, yet, we now know that is not true, some are so similar that recognition software cannot tell them apart. In fact people have been convicted of crimes having similar fingerprints. We should be looking at all the patterns of erosion on the Earth and Mars, perhaps these regions share something in common?

Perhaps the electromagnetic signatures of the rocks or resonance of the ion bonding and the acoustic pattern created by wind are similar. Just like two fingerprints contain some sort of genetic similarities. Would study of patterns of erosion help us in studying liquid flows, locating minerals for mining, oil for extraction, finding areas of healthy ELF resonance for organic growth? Are patterns of erosion completely predictable to the point we can estimate the origin or starting point of the pattern, the original equation or the original set of components, which started the process? For instance the beginning resonance, material and starting points? Can we go back in time by computer modeling of the current patterns? Can we use these computer-rendering simulations to help us understand the surfaces of other planets, moons and celestial bodies? Are we able to do this now with our advances in super computers?

Researchers are beginning to believe that the answers to all of these questions will most likely be yes and we can know if we dare to ask the questions and work to seek the answers. As we know from looking at ice core samples, tree trunk rings and sediment layers we can define eras of ice age cycles, solar cycles, Earth Polar Shifts, etc. Much of the needed computer modeling to track and back track erosion for historical perspective and understanding of our Planet and other worlds has been funded by animation simulations for military efforts in the battlespace. Commercial uses of such things have also accomplished wonders using ERSI software to improve environmental situations, weather prediction and control, flood control efforts, Oil Exploration, Movie Industry Special FX, landscape design and Artist Conception's of future technologies.

Experimentation, simulation modeling should continue in this realm to insure that we are accurately interpreting the data and adequately defining the forces at work. Recently we saw a runaway iceberg, which hit a tongue sticking out from the Ross Ice Shelf, everyone predicted a huge event, which would be seen from above by satellite. No such event could be seen and for good reason. Most of the ice berg was under water and obviously would hit first and it did on que, wedging itself, so the event did take place but underwater as the surface of the iceberg never touched anything, yet the damage of the collision was severe and intense underneath judging by the break up of surrounding ice. It is interesting the predictive animation simulations were so quick to show us what was going to happen, yet never did. This is an example of bad modeling prediction running away with imagination when in actuality we had enough data to show exactly what had occurred in advance.

Right now we have seen weather intensification in the form of extreme weather in our Hemisphere, we have complete modeling of past Hurricanes and are extremely good at predicting Hurricanes now. We also have complete knowledge of what will happen in the event of a direct hit in New Orleans and the 12-foot seawall? But are all our predictive modeling of simulations of the demise of New Orleans correct? Well, in fact they probably are pretty correct as are our prediction of increasing rise of ocean levels as the atmosphere heats up. Combining such data along with the vegetation build up at the mouth of the Mississippi River we see that merging of all this data shows that New Orleans is not long for this world. If we look at the river mouths of the largest rivers meeting the sea, we will see similarities to canyons and streams meeting lakes or connecting to slow flowing rivers.

Patterns of erosion are everywhere. In the middle of the desert you can see small flows turn into streams, to dry rivers to dry lake beds which have been there for centuries. It seems possible that we can put an equation to this if we are willing to build real life actual erosion labs and take that data and end-effect to show patterns. These patterns will be similar to those in nature and thus formulas using current mathematics can be conceived and tested. When attempting to control or change nature it is often a very small first event, which changes things as the events unfold and as the pattern is set in motion. He who creates the first event and puts in the equation and motions thru levers of action maybe able to quantify and put pencil to paper to predict the end event. Using reverse engineering calculations of these methodologies we can take the current erosion picture to questimate the origin of the first event.

Once we can do this we can see the past in the present pattern and thus we can see thru time unlocking ancient mysteries to our mother Earth. By understanding this process here at home we can in fact use this data to predict what happened in all those world's we seek to discover in mankind's quest of the unknown to quench the thirst to boldly go where no man has gone before.

For those who look at erosion, clouds, waves and patterns of nature it must become quite obvious of simplicity of the complex designs. We are in a very unique place to not only create new events, but to actually know what will become of what we create. Thus predicting the future of our actions. This means as we take control over our environment, we can with slight modification create a better world to fit our genetic pattern. By doing this we can prevent cataclysmic events, extend life, build safer cities, understand future explored worlds and continue our life experience with abundance.

Since erosion is an obvious pattern of nature, why would it be any different than any other pattern? Why would it not be controllable and predictable? We are rapidly approaching a time when we will be able to control our own DNA and destiny, thru an understanding of what it all means and how it all works. Shouldn't we use the study of patterns of erosion to help us explain what we see when our Unmanned Robotic Probes send us brilliant pictures back of other Worlds? Should we use these methodologies to tell us of previous events, first events and ancient cataclysmic events, which originally shaped all that we see and know? It is fascinating that Stephen Wolfram notes so many patterns in his work yet fails to identify patterns of erosion as one of nature's designs? Why was he not looking here? Was he unable to prove his hypothesis with these patterns of erosion, if so why? And are we busy looking to a simplistic formula in the creation of the first event that we failed to recognize the obviousness of interacting patterns upon one another?

For instance erosion is a factor of plate tectonics to build the mountains, weather patterns over many different cycles, so on first glance it may appear that no two patterns of erosion on our landscape are the same, yet how can we be so sure they did not come from an original equation set in motion, which presently we are observing as just another pattern of nature. I submit to you that these questions and the obvious patterns of erosion are not only worthy of thought and scientific debate, but the inherent secrets which will be revealed will be worth their weight in research funding.

If you have had thoughts on the patterns of erosion or similar patterns in nature or of the photos being brought back by our unmanned probes though out our solar system of landscapes of moons and planets, then you are not alone. Think about it.

"Lance Winslow" - If you have innovative thoughts and unique perspectives, come think with Lance; www.WorldThinkTank.net/wttbbs


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