Science Information

Down Scrolling Text to Find Patterns


I believe a program can be written to scan text such as an email, story or article in Western Languages, which might indicate a pattern which maybe of valuable insight. By Down Scrolling Text, which we have all done, whether thinking about it or not, we will most likely Find Patterns Which Indicate Hostile Intentions, sadness, stress or vengefulness. Perhaps you can determine intelligence levels, etc. Try it sometime. Read 10 pages of text from an individual and then put yourself in the writer's shoes. Was he-she angry in the article or report? Were they honest in their summation or point of issue? Was there a point of issue? Or like the uni-bomber did they ramble somewhat? Look at the text of Mienkoff or patterns in the Declaration of Independence.

I believe text and the patterns you can see when you concentrate on the pattern rather than the words while down scrolling, might give you more insight than you think. I have tried this with my own writings and remembered what else I was thinking during the article to classify each article. I found the patterns when down scrolling looked similar when the articles were similar in nature. For instance a scientific thought had a different pattern when down scrolling than a Rant and Raving about bureaucracy, stupid linear decision making or foreign powers exercising their self interest over that of the American People.

A good book on the subject of patterns is that by Stephen Wolfram. "A New Kind of Science" a book I recommend as even if you have a problem with this line of reasoning, it makes sense and it works for predictions, finding patterns, in history, biology, weather, algorithms, behavior, politics, sports, computer programming, nature, genetics, colors of cars on freeways, roads, population sizes of towns, federal reserve moves, economics, etc. Actually just about everything and if you read the book about John Nash he too was always looking for these patterns.

We find patterns everywhere and when something is out of place it stands out, big time. Like in the movie the Matrix I when the same cat was seen twice. Similar to high-speed events while adrenaline is flowing, and your brain goes into slow mo. We see this in frequency, energy, space flight, and aerodynamics. I submit to you that it also exists in text. You can probably design a program which can figure out "well-readness" "Intelligence" and "mood". But I bet if you studied it further you would find it also could predict anger, challenges in the writer, use of substances, passion, strength of charater, etc. A prisoner in jail writing letters or a young lady who keeps a diary or a scientist who keeps notes, or a leader who has written letters.

These all could be set up and studied by patterns, by scanning it into a computer and scrolling at a standard rate. The areas which look like stock market charts when looking laterally due to spaces between words tend to tell you something about the mood, the size of the words have to do with either the level of vocabulary, style, attitude or possibly the hostility of the subject author. I believe if we scanned all world text we could find patterns which would give away other patterns and lead us to those who are very angry, passionate, scared, etc. Now then is this a tool for psychologists, studying the authors of the past, studying patterns, which can lead us to understand or get into the head of the author. In the case of the uni-bomber could it have caught him earlier? In the case of an encoded terrorist message could it give us an indication of the reality of the message? The CIA said that 95% of all intelligence is bogus and either misdirection or pure bull sh_t. 5% of course having significance. If you can separate out the BS through the process of elimination, you might be able to determine reality from threats and not needlessly alarm the American People on false alarms and have a better understanding of the intelligence collected.

This is of serious benefit and like studying hand writing and sentence structure, perhaps we could have found another idea or possibly develop a tool which could do this for us and thrust through millions of articles in a few seconds to find trends and patterns and level of chatter in order to find anomalies within the patterns of text in each language. Think about it. I have. The NSA has hundreds of terra bytes of information from collection of intense data. But as Sam Walton would tell you, data just for the sake of collecting data is worthless unless it is thoroughly looked over, which takes time and people of which we do not have either. Such a tool could be developed relatively easily I bet.

"Lance Winslow" - If you have innovative thoughts and unique perspectives, come think with Lance; www.WorldThinkTank.net/wttbbs


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