Science Information

Military Convoy Artificial Tubes for Safe Travel


There appears to be a way to control the safety of an entire convoy of logistical vehicles on a long highway, with no close air support and completely removed from satellite communication or AWACS Surveillance. Let me explain this concept. First picture a pentagon horizontal shaped tube, which extends along a highway, which starts at the ground. The supply road of travel would be in the middle of the tube. Now then, a vehicle in the back would have a laser system, which would be facing forward in a slightly increasing perspective angle to encompass several hundred yards as it approached the first third of the front of the convoy.

The vehicles would travel within the pentagon shaped tube encased in non-penetrable set of waves while under complete control from the last and first vehicle. Inside this tube on the highway vehicles would travel autonomously using networked sensors.

http://worldthinktank.net/wttbbs/index.php?showtopic=87

The vehicle in the back would have a high-energy antenna facing forward, which would send out the waves by laser-sound, electro-magnetic combination. This would create forward facing walls paralleling the direction of the convoy. Through out the convoy would be devices mounted on vehicles every 20 vehicles, which send up waves, which would bounce off the impenetrable walls at all angles within the artificial parameter of the tube.

A concept not so distant from the idea of a layered ionosphere able to bounce multiple different frequencies for nearly unlimited world wide communication without satellites. For more information the HAARP Project has some excellent white papers on this.

This encased wave induced tube would provide a safety net to protect our convoy, which would identify anything, which came close to the convoy, such as heat signatures of combatants, laser ground sensors, land mines or enemy military hardware. (Incidentally we have drawings and the math if you have military clearances and the cash).

Now then since the artificial tube has much power and a specific band which blocks the other sensing waves from penetrating they bounce off the inner artificial tube walls and hit the ground and bounce back on the walls and are picked up again by the sending device every 20 vehicles or so, which are also all networked together within the tube. These sensing devices are continuously mapping as you go and sensing anything that might be a threat, while the convoy quietly moves on down the road.

The tube would also keep electronic surveillance out like a shell. Such tube could also be displayed with no convoys as to fool the enemy into thinking that there might be a convoy where one did not exist at all as a diversionary tactic. The enemy would be able to see the disruptive wave along the highway, but no way to penetrate it to determine what was actually in the tube coming in. It could prevent some night vision equipment, radar, etc from penetrating. The more power in the wave the more it could keep out. Due to the fact the tube would be a combination of waves it could also cause pre-detonation of ordinance passing thru it, by use of acoustic beams, thus keep the convoy safe and add another dimension of defense.

The last vehicle would also project back wards with passive radar for enemy aircraft and to the satellite or other device if available or desired.

"Lance Winslow" - If you have innovative thoughts and unique perspectives, come think with Lance; www.WorldThinkTank.net/wttbbs


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