Science Information

Building a Single Unit CO2 Laser Grid


When using a CO2 Laser to shoot down an incoming projectile, which enters a safety zone, it will be necessary to hold the laser on the target for about 5 seconds or more. To do this we must be able to shoot the laser in a grid, therefore if the projectile or aircraft or guided missile or even a UAV takes evasive action such as a high- speed high "G" 90 degree turn you can still register a kill on the target. Because, whichever direction it turns it will still be well within the grid and the grid can re-direct to center the target within the grid until the 3000 plus degrees of the laser destroy it.

To do this you have the laser fired into a reflective ball which is convex in shape and then those rays are the derivative of the first ray, as each ray comes back to the base it has a series of mirrors which focus onto the grid pattern of the three dimensional box to contain the target you are tracking or multiple targets. This saves energy in that you do not need multiple lasers or units or energy systems to run and shoot down multiple targets or high readily evasive targets, which are programmed to go into a random sequence of flight characteristics upon encountering high heat, high frequency or high-powered lasers of any type. Whether they be CO2, Argon Gas, Helium, N2 or high energy wave systems. As the targets are destroyed the radar reconfigures the most amount of un-killed targets left and readjusts. Until the last target is defeated. Doubling or tripling up like the Vietnam War SAMs might also be a good idea.

These units would move and work in a team and/or net-centric configuration incase of one malfunctioning or being hit. These units could be run by way of remote and or autonomous systems for border patrol or even on a destroyer guarding a battleship or Carrier. These systems if built small enough might someday be able to defend in tight proximity of temporary airbase logistical assets.

"Lance Winslow" - If you have innovative thoughts and unique perspectives, come think with Lance; www.WorldThinkTank.net/wttbbs


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