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Tunneling Concepts for Advanced Warfare


I propose research be done to make unmanned tunneling machines to help in warfare. Today more than ever we see the problems with urban warfare. We have developed great techniques such as aerial unmanned vehicles, robotic mechanisms, devices which see in the dark, through buildings and around corners. We have listening devices, scanners, helicopters and special tactics training with the help of virtual reality, mock buildings and pop-up back guys like an advanced video game on in a practice city block.

We are fighting urban warfare house-by-house and room-by-room. We are often met by insurgents, who will hide and wait for our advances or they will booby trap buildings and plant above ground roadside bombs along our logistical paths.

This is why I propose easily deployable unmanned tunneling machines, which can go into the battlespace, undetected and underground where they are not suspected. Pop up into a room or building or behind a wall and take care of business. These units can be deployed and help save and rescue captured hostages, which await execution by beheading. We have larger tunneling devices, which are used to make roads, build rail tunnels, runoff ditches or make way for pipes, cables or telephone lines. A scaled down version of this with a very powerful tunneling tool attachment might give us the edge we need and the element of surprise as the enemy is expecting a helicopter, UAV, SWAT team special forces approach or typical tactic.

A tunneling machine could show up unexpectedly in the enemies back yard, throw out a small explosive device or a non-lethal stun weapon into a room or near a wall and then send a signal of coast is clear to the good guys. Great for hostage situations or rescue as well. Many uses indeed.

"Lance Winslow" - If you have innovative thoughts and unique perspectives, come think with Lance; www.WorldThinkTank.net/wttbbs


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