Science Information

Why Can't Our Brain Process What We See Faster?


Many who admire the excellent design of Mother Nature and the gift of vision and the enhancements thru evolution wonder; Why Can't Our Brain Process What We See Faster? A paper by G. Bugmann and J. G. Taylor suggests that retinal jitter is an issue and could be some of the reason for the delay in the process time, thus by eliminating the extraneous visual input data into the brain the retina would not attempt to over define the object, because it is not necessary, once the object is seen, in a lesser definition, it has been registered and the eye simply moves on.

Retinal jitter in the human system could become a non-issue by using a device, which attached to the skull as an upside down extra jaw bone type system, which could be pulled down over the eye which would take out the bumps using algorithm averaging of the object (s) being viewed. This would even out the bounces before the eye gets the information, therefore the retinal jittery being reduced could possibly cut the time of in processing by half because some of the relay events will no longer be needed will not be needed. Question being how small can we make such a device and would it need to be over both eyes? Since you would no longer need the eye's sight to cross in front of the other for distance measurements. Which also means that the eye-brain processing time has one less thing to do. When a human looks at a car, truck, boat, airplane, or even a cup of coffee, it taps the memory simultaneously for verification of that item. Once that item is discovered and recognized much of the visual input can be skipped over. Similar to Frame Bursting concepts in high-speed data transmissions, for instance here is a brief concept along that lines:

http://worldthinktank.net/wttbbs/index.php?showtopic=217

http://worldthinktank.net/wttbbs/index.php?showtopic=250

Once the object is identified as a car, helicopter, Jeep, Basket Ball, then the mind fills in the rest even if the eyes have not fully yet registered the rest. This can also occasionally fool us as our memory can over ride our observations in that we do not look for the anomalies associated with a similar but not exact match, but then our eyes continue to focus and bring the rest of the information to the brain. If the device attached figures out such details for our eyes and displays a picture quickly with less definition and features in a virtual reality form within the current perceived reality of the real world then the mind will be able to process this information faster once we have become accustomed to it.

Will our actual preference be changed as to which reality we rather prefer? Which perception we would rather be in, during observational visual stimulation? Perhaps, after all cartoons are quite fun to watch are they not? Would augmented reality help us take in more visual data faster when we most needed it in high risk and stress environments? Think about it.

"Lance Winslow" - If you have innovative thoughts and unique perspectives, come think with Lance; www.WorldThinkTank.net/wttbbs


MORE RESOURCES:
This RSS feed URL is deprecated, please update. New URLs can be found in the footers at https://news.google.com/news


The Atlantic

When Pop-Up Books Taught Popular Science
The Atlantic
But popular science books posed some new challenges for both authors and readers. Since antiquity, teachers had held that scientific subjects were best learned through pictures and working models. Beginners needed to see, touch, and manipulate the ...



Vox

Trump's not sure about believing climate science. The Saudis and Putin get the benefit of the doubt.
Vox
In a combative interview on CBS's 60 Minutes aired on Sunday, journalist Lesley Stahl pushed Trump on recent hurricanes, including Hurricane Michael, and the role many scientists say climate change is playing in extreme weather. The president has ...

and more »


Washington Post

EPA scraps pair of air pollution science panels - The Washington Post
Washington Post
The Trump administration's decision is part of a wider plan to change the way the agency reviews science.
EPA scraps pair of air pollution science panelsStars and Stripes

all 13 news articles »


KUSI

52 Weeks of Science Clairemont: One Year Celebration
KUSI
SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – The Fleet Science Center's 52 Weeks of Science Clairemont is celebrating one year today. Elizabeth Alvarez was live at Madison High School to check it out. 52 Weeks of Science brings researchers, engineers and scientists to local ...



Forbes

'First Man' Strives To Get The Science And The Story Right
Forbes
I was born the year the United States first landed on the Moon. I've grown up with those images and with a respect—bordering on reverence—for astronauts in general. NASA has been a source of innovation and a beacon of inspiration for decades.

and more »


Science Daily

Scientists achieve first ever acceleration of electrons in plasma waves
Science Daily
AWAKE is an international scientific collaboration, made up of engineers and scientists from 18 institutes, including CERN and the Max Planck Institute for Physics in Germany. A UNIST-based research group, led by Professor Moses Chung in the Department ...

and more »


Madison.com

Lunchroom leftovers make for an 'eye-opening' science project
Madison.com
The project was a new twist to the Wisconsin Science Festival produced by the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation, UW-Madison and the Morgridge Institute for Research. This year the Wisconsin Society of Science Teachers and the Wisconsin Science ...



STAT

Coming to terms with six years in science: obsession, isolation, and moments of wonder
STAT
The scientists I worked alongside had their compulsions as well. Obsessed with our projects, we worked 60 to 90 hours a week. Together, we normalized our monomania. At times it was beautiful — a force building upon itself to generate new ideas and ...



Infographic: The Most Talked About Science Stories This Week
ScienceAlert
In a time of crazy political and world news, it's often easy to overlook some of the ridiculously cool things happening in science. To make sure you don't miss out, we've put together this shareable image highlighting the best science news of the past ...



Live Science

Child 'Vampire' Was Buried 1,550 Years Ago in Italy - Live Science
Live Science
A 1550-year-old "vampire burial" of a child with a rock stuffed into his or her mouth has been discovered in an ancient cemetery in Lugnano, Italy.
'Vampire burial' reveals efforts to prevent child's return from graveScience Daily

all 84 news articles »

Google News

home | site map | Xray Photography
© 2006