Science Information

Saving Private Ryan in Iraq - Stop the Bleeding


I propose that we give soldiers an ultra thin material, which will either be an undergarment to their uniform or incorporated as a liner within that uniform. This liner in the uniform will be laced with a Blood Coagulation Product. Specifically it will use the Blood Coagulations products by: Z-Medica Corporation.

http://www.z-medica.com

If we use the ultra thin material as a under garment, it will act as a new super thin skin, which the military is contemplating for soldiers under the Army's FutureForce initiative. I propose that contained between the linings or in side a normal uniform a lining tow layers sandwiched around the blood coagulation product, which if the human skin was pierce or broke open from a wound the blood coagulation product would flow onto and into the wound? This is because what ever pierced the skin would have also pierced the two layers of ultra thin material and would release the product.

The blood coagulation product would always be there between to linings and would only liquefy if the inner most lining met air or came in contact with the human blood. In this case a wounded soldier would not need anyone to administer the blood coagulation product it, would already be automatically present. If the soldier was wounded in the face he could self apply it by cutting a piece of the ultra thin material and putting on his face or skin which was not already being covered by the ultra thin material. A soldier could take a knife and cute the liner and administer it himself or fellow soldier or civilian victim. This is good because there is no need to wait for a medic or robotic counterpart for rescue in those critical moments.

Additionally this blood coagulation product could also be used in combination with the new scientific research just out that was able to put a mammal (a rat only so far) into hibernation using a chemical. By using this ultra thin material as a second skin, under garment or lining in a soldiers uniform along with chemicals for instant hibernation; we could literally slow the vital signs and stop the bleeding until the first responders, medical technicians or robotic medics arrived.

"Lance Winslow" - If you have innovative thoughts and unique perspectives, come think with Lance; www.WorldThinkTank.net/wttbbs


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