Science Information

Mystical Physicists


INSPIRATIONAL COMMENTS:

"There is a principle which is a bar against all information, which is proof against all arguments and which cannot fail to keep a man in everlasting ignorance - that principle is contempt prior to investigation. - Herbert Spencer"

Albert Einstein - "We are seeking for the simplest possible scheme of thought that will bind together the observed facts."

"If we do not expect the unexpected, we will never find it." - Heraclitus

"Human beings, by changing the inner attitudes of their minds, can change the outer aspects of their lives." - William James

"I feel that if we could be serious for an hour and really fathom, delve into ourselves as much as we can, we should be able to release, not through any action of will, a certain sense of energy that is awake all the time, which is beyond thought." - Jiddhu Krishnamurti, Madras, 1961

Heraclitus: "? conceded the existence of an over-riding, all-encompassing unity, in which the apparently contradictory opposites are all linked to one another, in a single, regular, cohesive system of balanced, harmonious measure and just order."

"Consciousness is a singular of which the plural is unknown. There is only one thing, and that which seems to be a plurality is merely a series of different aspects of this one thing, produced by a deception, the Indian maya, as in a gallery of mirrors." - Erwin Schrdinger

I think this means that all the talk about anomalous or truthful science is a bunch of you know what from the ego of man. We are 'connected' and our real self is not our ego. I am also of the opinion that he sees something I think is the nature of reality about the personality that some insist continues in such things as past-life regressions. Yes, perhaps through limbo and obsessions some things stay in this materially focused frame of reference (I have performed exorcisms) but when we are reborn all those memories of other lives are memories of a collective oversoul not anything like an individual soul. Maya and samsara or the 'busy-mind' do indeed deceive as he says - and though a few will gain great insight into the plural they will still be far from totally informed. Thus we must be open to all possibilities.

"Inherent to wave mechanics are the mechanisms of wave superposition and parallel and non-linear information processing. And these mechanisms, which are also affected and regulated by the laws of thermodynamics, are responsible for information growth and the evolution of biological matter. Information begets information." - Laurent from Gaithersburg, Maryland.

INTRODUCTION:

Our reason (philosophy), should concern our 'selves' with the field of metaphysics. Metaphysics is the study of three entities: the 'individual being', the universe or what we call reality and what lies beyond the universe. Metaphysics is the study of how and why the 'individual being', the universe, and what lies beyond the universe interact with each other. Metaphysics is the study of whether or not all three, or for that matter if any of the three, exist. Metaphysics is the study of how and why the three interact, if in fact they do exist. Metaphysics is the pondering over the questions: Where are we? What are we? Why do we exist? It could be argued that Descartes was one of its more prominent figures with his initiation of the concept of 'knowing', of existing, when he said 'Cogito, ergo sum' (I think, therefore I am). Or, as Popeye said "I yam wut I Yam".

There are many people who are secure in the knowledge that all is right with the world and they feel good about how they personally think about themselves and their soul. I confess I have a lot of confidence but I am not so certain about what the human experience really entails. I see so much more all the time. The opening of each door seems to lead to there being more doors and more books to write therefore. The people who are sure of god being in heaven or those who have bought the 'world of seems to be' may not like this honest expression of what might be real; but they should know that most of the physicists sense there is a lot more than even they know. I love the quantum physicists for all the wondrous soulful things they seem to be able to explain better than me in so many ways. I can hope that a few readers will be those who do not believe in the soul and that after reading this they will be less certain but I do not encourage belief or the closure of possibilities it brings. There are many ways that illusions of separation cause transient errors made by the ego or the persona (Greek for mask) worn by actors during a momentary diversion called life.

In fact I do not think of the soul as continuing beyond this event horizon or material body with anything that ego or personality contains although I do think some of the elemental energy in a limbo state can impact on these reported re-incarnations with something like that until the person grows or harmonizes enough to move on. Religious I am not, for certain; mystic I can be at times I suppose; but mostly I observe like the alchemists who developed the scientific method.

A neuroscience forum which I was invited to has had many people respond to various postings without identifying themselves. I think some of that is because they have a reputation to protect or job they value. Here is one such response to a thread I started.

"Science is reductionist whereas mysticism is broadly integrative. It would seem that science and mysticism occupy anti-podal positions. They are both concerned with truth, yet go about it differently. Science seeks to objectively and mathematically describe truth, whereas mysticism seeks to experience truth. Science and mysticism are flip sides of the same coin. The greatest scientists have invariantly been deeply mystical. I'm tempted to say that the greatest mystics have invariantly been deeply scientific, or at least had an appreciation for science, but this I'm less certain of."

I responded by saying I agreed and that I was certain the sages or greatest scientists were indeed very spiritual. One of those sages is David Bohm (Whose Holographic Universe has many adherents at the Yerkes Primate Center where hard physiological proofs are found.) and here is a little of how he approached physics.

"In an interview in 1989 at the Nils Bohr Institute in Copenhagen, where Bohm presented his views, Bohm spoke on his theory of wholeness and the implicate order. The conversation centered around a new worldview that is developing in part of the Western world, one that places more focus on wholeness and process than analysis of separate parts. Bohm explained the basics of the theory of relativity and its more revolutionary offspring, quantum theory. Either theory, if carried out to its extreme, violates every concept on which we base our understanding of reality. Both challenge our notions of our world and ourselves.

He cited evidence from both theories that support a new paradigm of a more interrelated, fluid, and less absolute basis of existence, one in which mind is an active participant. 'Information contributes fundamentally to the qualities of substance.' He discussed forms, fields, superconductivity, wave function and electron behavior. 'Wave function, which operates through form, is closer to life and mind... The electron has a mindlike quality.'" (1)

The early quantum physicists like Neils Bohr were ridiculed by those who could not comprehend the majesty of their attempts to explain our reality. The debunker's inductive reasoning which imposes direct inferential theory upon nature has caused a setback that science has yet to overcome. Despite their stated fear of religion these theories are in fact doing what the Dark Ages did to sincere seekers of truth. It was the dawning of a New Age which revived ancient Chaos Science. Our whole computerized creative and productive world is largely a function of these 'atom mysticists'. In response to that epithet they have driven the message home by showing over and over again that most know-nothing scientists are in cahoots with ignorance or worse. Michio Kaku of Hyperspace does it well.

These giants of intellect found the soul of the Mandukya Upanishads (Wigner) and the S-Matrix math in the Tao Te Ching (Capra). Heisenberg 'observed' as the cat appeared, or did not, depending on whether Schrdinger was there to witness. All Zen aficionados were overjoyed to see the Western predilection for linear thinking in boxes was being changed from within. A far greater amount of possibility-thinking and real independent inquiry has resulted. All theatres of thought are now called post-Modern by 'experts' in ivory towers who are usually wrong. Bohr said, 'A great truth has an opposite which is also true. A trivial truth has an opposite which is false.'

The Club of Rome is doing a lot of good analysis of issues and the need for multi-disciplinarian principles in a new technological era. Here is something they say which I heartily approve of.

"Systems of education are less and less adapted to the new issues, to the new emerging global society we are presently involved in. New priorities force us to redefine the role of education, which should be conceived as a permanent learning process. Transmission of knowledge is no longer sufficient, and new objectives such as developing one's own potential and creativity, or the capacity of adaptation to change are becoming essential in a rapidly changing world.

The Club of Rome considers that education is both part of the global problematique and also an essential tool to become an effective actor in control of one's own life and within society. If there are "Limits to Growth", there are "No Limits to Learning" (titles of two Reports to the Club of Rome)." (2)

In the area of physics the Classical Electromagnetic Model or particles and force constructs, have given way to wave behavior models that allow harmonic interaction and affinity across space-time as I see it. There are some people who have such an ingrained or visceral response to mystical concepts that it makes one wonder how effective our propaganda paradigm that has waged war on enablement of the soul in each living thing has been. The space-time interval is only invariant in same frequency realms and astrophysicists know gravity is an instantaneous effect. Brian Greene is the first physicist with 'groupies' according to George Stephanopoulos, one time Clinton Press Secretary. Greene wrote the ELEGANT UNIVERSE a best-seller that explains String Theory and how it could answer some of the deepest aspects of human experience. He made a major contribution in 1992 that showed how the fabric of space could tear and repair itself. This is not possible according to relativity and its expression of the space/time continuum. The existence of anti-matter and 'black holes' are quite a conundrum for science that finds itself proving the mystics understandings - 'fast and furious'.

My premise at its worst is that we must understand the mystics even if they are wrong about reality. There will be little achieved by constantly negating whatever reality they have been able to 'see' and there has been a lot of advancement in science that proves they were right. But when told that this line of reasoning is religious or 'airy-fairy' I can only say - if we do not know how the sages or great minds saw reality how can we expect to help make a new reality that is better? How can you call Pythagoras weird (for example) when he contributed so much? How can people be so silly when they know they can't do what he did? Is it ego that makes man so closed-minded? Here is a response to a physicist who sees (finally) that I have gathered the words of the top scientists, who agree with me. He seeks to rationalize the 'One' and understand the ego - which is a start at least.

Rational? Is that missing from the work of philosophers like Sartre who said 'Love is absent space'. No - what is missing is an appeal to reductive and gradualistic paradigm ego or the need for POWER above all else. But that need for power actually produces less power and plentitude.

I tell you this - you do not know consciousness or it's origin and you can find the best explanations in ancient writings and disciplines like the Sutras. It works!

Is what works rational? Not necessarily. Rational and religion or the anthropomorphing urge of ego is everywhere evident in non-cooperative mindsets.

Here is the way I could say it off the top of my head.

In the beginning there was energy in many dimensions. These dimensions gradually got in touch at some distance with information carried on attractive forces like gravity. These contacts grew and pathways formed - see my article called Affinity under those Google links or here. The pathways became lattices and vectors and valences of these energies which began to design ways to form new harmonizing potentials.

Laws of behavior and some kind of design began to actualize or manifest and over trillions of years a lot of knowledge and ways of creating became the way of the world or universes.

Consciousness came later and the soul is an outgrowth of this collective which directs us through the structures and lattices (helical and otherwise - time has a helical structure and seven layers too) in the likes of DNA.

World-Mysteries.com has some of my books.


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