Science Information

Theoretically is it Possible to Defy Gravity?


Many believe it is possible to build an anti-gravity machines and there are many small version which can do this by interfering with the gravity waves. Other say why build an anti-gravity wave machine when you can use the gravity to pull you the other way. Some say hogwash; conspiracy theories and UFOs and all the other stuff. They flat say it can never be done. If you see it done it is a trick, it is impossible they say.

Well how about a gravity reflector; which takes the gravity waves and increases them on which ever side it needs to move towards? Collect the gravity waves and enhance them. Many talk about using pulse or gravity wave interference waves; gamma bursts or high-energy usage waves to get between it. Why not take in the gravity waves in a pass thru mechanism, collect them as they approach the object and re-direct them around your object to the other side and enhance them. Thus the gravity wave pulling you is now being used to slow you down or stop you or even like a Star Wars traction beam now pulling you away? How hard could that be really?

We divert radar waves; redirect sound waves. We have direction microwave, ultrasonic, light, etc.. Use a wave within a wave scenario; out going cone shaped wave to collect it to a point and then allow it a pass thru and as it leave it pull? A thought. Yet there are many ways to modulate, sculpt and manipulate frequency and waves. Maybe we are looking at the problem backwards. We should be thinking of re-direction or creation of gravity waves as much as the elimination of them thru our current red lining running studies of disruption. We should be using the whole track, the whole brain and the whole field to be thinking on.

The most interesting projects right now seem to be with NASA, Lockheed and The Boeing Company Research divisions. Germany, Japan and others are too studying this stuff. Way out stuff if you consider the laws of Newton and apples falling from trees to be your basis. I guess it would be time to move forward on the future uses of gravity. Think of the applications for gravity control. Too hot; Global warming, orbit further from the sun. Global Cooling; come closer again? For space ship, travel, airlifts of entire populations from SuperPlume impending death or Massive Mother Nature events it would be cool to put them all on a giant football field size flying carpet and merely moving them to a safer local? Would also be very good for moving major heavy weight from our atmosphere to space for deployment or Moon Bases?

I often contemplate if power issues are the major problem we believe it to be?

Maybe it is just our inability to manipulate, create or control it. This is a temporary issue from our linear thinking on the issue from past academia and physics study. We have unlimited power in the universe, borrow some, return it, it is not created or destroyed, merely borrowed and returned. Think on this.

"Lance Winslow" - If you have innovative thoughts and unique perspectives, come think with Lance; www.WorldThinkTank.net/wttbbs


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