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Institute of Noetic Sciences


The possibility of sentient beings on earlier solar systems said to be many billions of years older than our own, developing travel and transposition of some teleportational nature seems one of the most stable and down to earth possibilities when we consider these spheres. Other ideas flit through our mind as we imagineer the conscious wisdom of refined metallurgical objects beyond mere silica microchips and revisit what Dr Robins termed the megaliths - macrochips. What is the operating system they are part and parcel of? Is the old Gaian theory of the earth far removed from a universal entity that would have implants in the earth to form greater contact? The manganese nodules occur naturally but what difference does that make when one is thinking about evolving layers of consciously connected matter guided by dimensional force entities of non-corporeal nature? That kind of thought might lead us to worship the Ka'aba with a lot more validity.

The spheres could also be put there to influence stability and join with other earth energy forces to actuate specific occurrences we are only remotely able to understand. It could be from our own future or from an earlier adept civilization whose attunement was collectively superior to what exists today. This kind of thought is more 'far-out' than David M. Jacobs, Ph. D. and the alien abduction agenda contemplated in his books Secret Life and The Threat. His associate professorship in history at Temple University makes one feel good about the possible future of free-thought in America. What sense does it make in one's day to day life to think about such wild imagineering? Well, that IS where the rubber hits the road as they say; and we humbly suggest that even in this life while physically manifest in sensual containers with high level focus on the joy these senses bring - we are part of the evolving purpose and what has been called God's greater purpose. We also suggest the way of knowledge and positive application of the results of thinking does not advantage one if they turn away from the facts. These spheres are facts and they can not have designs (or the vase from 300,000,000 years ago) of this complexity and be so metallurgically advanced if we take only our present concept of nature into account.

Is the flexible metal that can't be cut with welder's torches which is shown by the son of the Roswell whistle-blower drawn from the same manufacture process? A personal friend of mine says he knows a chemist/metallurgical researcher who was sent such material from the States to a place just east of Oshawa/Toronto. They could conceive no earthly explanation for it. Now which of these 'possibilities' do you wish to contemplate? The alien one has abductee experiences and hybrid genetics that include clearly extraterrestrial conclusions. The prior earth civilization with advanced technology and attunements beyond language and its limits, means matter can be sent back through time. When NEC Labs at Princeton observed 300X light speed in Cesium, the argument can still be made that time travel is not possible for complex systems that are living. So what if muons have an ability to communicate or travel in the dimensional or other intricate manners we are close to understanding. Cesium is the most accurate means of tracing time in clocks in a great improvement over quartz which we have seen in the piezo-electric description of Dr Robins. Each different crystalline structure is an expression of the forming building blocks and their consciousnesses. Bucky Fuller and the Fullerenes named after him come rushing to the forefront of my mind.

Nanotubes are part of a creative process that harmonizes to the rhythm of something we may soon know. There are ways to imagine the spheres could have been created by advanced human or other earth sentient beings in conjunction with the spirit and wisdom of the shamanic relationship in vortexes and wisdom thereof. These would require some form of teleportation and the prevalence of spheres in this one area may be in response to a forceful build-up of whatever forms the manganese nodules or because of the same forces or intelligence from other parts of the universe such as whatever causes the meteors to collect in amazing numbers near Mt. Yamato (Or Yamamoto) in Antarctica.

In attempting to come up with a way to express or communicate the places where the mind goes in integrating these truly mysterious things we are asking the reader to endure another German Nazi analogy on the slippery slope of ethics and the relative nature of morality. We all know the Nazis were heavy into esoterics and ancient civilization from the Spielberg trilogy but it was much more than just a hobby or some weird obsession. In fact you could say it was being done by others in secret bases; but we can't be sure of a great deal of these things because of the secrecy surrounding some weapons systems that even long after they are no longer in use aren't talked about. It is almost certain that Hitler and his cronies or handlers like General Hausohofer and Himmler were well aware of the weapons systems described in the Mahábhárata. They seem to have attempted to make most of them become real and their scientists were helpful to the development of these things after the war. Some of the things were already on the drawing boards and tested. Were they also in a position to know about the Foo Fighters?

"On the night of 15 November 1944 the team of Elmore and Mapes again recorded a first - a nightime visual confirmation on a night flying Me163. Lt. Mapes remembers it well:

'We were flying what was known as a "free-lance" intruder mission around Bonn, Germany. It was around 2300 hours before we hit our area. The overcast was at 4000 ft. with a beautiful moonlit clear sky above. Suddenly, I picked up a "bogey" on my radar that was high above us and travelling at a terrific speed. Just as it was about to pass over us, Elmore put us into a hard 180 degree turn. I could not find it on the radar and looked out above us. The sight was unbelievable! It appeared to be shaped like a wedge of pie with a long plume of flame coming from its rear end.

I kept watching him and calling out where he was over the intercom. He appeared to be in a tight circle directly above us. About the time that Elmore got a visual, the flame died down to a glow and it started to spiral down on us. I could see intermittent bursts of fire from the nose, and knew it was cannon or machine gun fire. I relayed this on and we began taking violent evasive action. Suddenly, this strange aircraft broke off and went into a vertical climb, with a long plume of flame shooting out the rear end. After several manoeuvres like this, we both agreed it was the new German Me 163 rocket plane. We never could get in a position to fire on it because of its tight spiralling and rapid climbs. Finally, it left the area and we never saw it again. Although we never fired a shot at it, it was a very memorable mission!'" (18)

John von Neumann may not have known why all his teachers encouraged him to follow so many unconventional paths and Hitler may have a greater enduring part to play in the intergalactic 'seeding' of space and other advanced cloaking and cloning devices than even the Sanskrit texts contemplate. Please check into the von Neumann probes taking genetic material to other galactic planets at our present time. Could the 'spheres' have encoded or time release information? It can seem almost fun and beyond science fiction to go too far down this road. What is too far? We hope you'll decide for yourself and not cater to the conventional or societal norm like the good citizens of Germany did when they heard rumors about the 'fun' going on with Jews in concentration camps.

EDGAR MITCHELL: - The Noetic Sciences people are lucky to have this former astronaut (Astronaut Michael Collins similarly deals in spiritual truth from history) as part of their team of scientists. They have seminars that that cover much of the kind of thing that the future must bring into being our reality. Here is the intro to one of his workshops:

"For almost 400 years, western civilization has been structured around the Cartesian conclusion that body and mind belong to separate realms of existence. But Descartes was wrong; they are but two faces of an intelligent, creative, self-organizing, learning, trial and error, interactive, participatory, evolving universe. This Dyadic model proposes that existence and the ability to know (consciousness) both arise from the same concept - energy - an energy that contains the seeds of knowing. Non-local information about the physical universe provides the missing link between objective science and subjective experience, including the mystical experience. We will explore these concepts with ample time for questions and discussion.

Edgar Mitchell, Apollo 14 Astronaut - sixth man to walk on the moon (1971), Founder, Institute of Noetic Sciences (1973), Author of Psychic Exploration and The Way of The Explorer. A pioneer in efforts to expand science toward understanding consciousness and inner experience. From the vicinity of the Moon, Ed Mitchell viewed planet Earth among the separate galaxies, the stars and planets, and had a transformative experience that changed his life. He left his job as a naval officer and astronaut, founded IONS {The institute of Noetic Sciences from which this excerpt is taken. I highly recommend them and a visit to their web site for starters.}, and began a rigorous exploration of links between inner and outer journeys, between science and spirituality."

He is a honorary member of the Club of Budapest and I will list some of the names including his here at this point, but I want you to ask yourself whether Von Neumann, Wigner, St. Germain and others from that region are somehow esoterically connected. It seems to be a hotbed of interesting things and people going along with Rudolf I's Prague and Vienna. Every one of these people could be highlighted in this book and I would have to say they are all excellent role models. The list comes from www.planetaryvision.net/page21.html.

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Columnist for The ES Press Magazine
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