Science Information

Earthquake and Disaster Delays in Scientific Innovation


In our present period we are continually reminded that we live on the surface of the planet and with that great honor comes issues of Mother Nature we must deal with. It is a fair trade off, as you get sunshine, warmth and heat from the sun; water, fish and surfing opportunities from the ocean and the stars, moon and cosmos to propel thought, enlightenment and understanding of who we are and perhaps some insight into why we are here. These are all wonderful things we enjoy and with every positive there is a negative, with every up there is a down and with every action a reaction. So then, let's talk about the negative side of things; which we are reminded of all too often: Hurricanes, Tornadoes, Earthquakes, Tsunamis, Typhoons, Volcanoes, Wild Fires and Floods.

Each and every disruption causes havoc in man's quest to better his civilization or understand the quantities and systems of our world and current paradigm. Since for the most part we know where such disaster will most likely occur; for instance Hurricanes in Florida, Earthquakes on the West Coast and Typhoons, Earthquakes, volcanic activity in Japan; we should therefore be careful not to have non-duplicated scientific study, critical information storage or scientists in such vulnerable places.

This is not to say that Illinois or New York City could not have an Earthquake tomorrow or that California's Southern Coastline could not get pounced by a Hurricane. We know from climate models, geology and fossil records that many such events other than mankinds own sound and fury or civil unrest has occurred throughout our evolution in all parts of the Globe. We have lost vast amounts of knowledge from prior civilizations; Ancient World Libraries, Entire Civilizations, etc. We should however when playing the odds play them to the best of our abilities, be careful of putting to many eggs in one basket and have backup storage of knowledge and protect those humans who will be able to help propel the forward progression of the human endeavor in the future. Am I advocating the building of underground cities in sold rock or moving those scientists, thinkers and leaders to a safer haven? Yes, in a way I am, but more importantly suggesting that we have contingency plans in place for our top scientific universities.

If we fail to innovate we will slide backwards and risk losing all we are and all we have built. It is bad enough that we are busy as human beings plotting against our neighbors thru wars or International Terrorism; that we have to defend the flows of our civilization, which serve us all, humans world wide. We are busy protecting ourselves from each other rather than finding friends in our larger challenge, that of mother nature or fixing of our own systems. For instance the train derailment of the other day in Pakistan; conductor error, misread a switch sign; 170 people died. We have technologies for trains and rail to prevent that. The London Train Bombing more humans killing humans over the dogma details of the divine by deranged disciples, why not fix these issues? We saw Hurricane Dennis destroy and devastate and the Indonesia Tsunami killed nearly 200,000 folks enjoying their day. Each time we allow disruption in our determined quest to press on we lose ground in our future innovations. Thus slowing our progression to our future utopia we seek and humankind's destiny. Think on this.

"Lance Winslow" - If you have innovative thoughts and unique perspectives, come think with Lance; www.WorldThinkTank.net/wttbbs


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