Science Information

MP Apprehension of High Strung or Drunken Soldiers


Recently scientists have discovered the hydrogen sulfide gas caused mice to go into spontaneous hibernation. The genetic similarities to the mammalian class humans belong to includes these rodents as well. The ability to put humans into spontaneous hibernation has incredible military applications, most of which have to do with stopping an advancing army, simply put them to sleep and thus serve your political will without having to kill them. Indeed this would change the battle space of the future in a way no one probably ever considered.

There is another military application for hydrogen sulfide gas that has not yet been discussed. That is to arm the Military Police with canisters of hydrogen sulfide gas to break up bar fights or subdue an out of control high-strung soldier with a weapon. The stress of warfare can cause behavior, which is not typical of the normal displacement of the individual. Work hard play hard also occurs during basic training or between deployments. Soldiers, young men, do have spikes in hormones and testosterone, which when put under this stress will cause severe behavioral issues. Whereas the killer instinct in necessary for survival in the heat of battle it can cause problems and such a soldier which is out of control and wants to kill someone, can be stopped short with a quick long-term nap rather than an escalation fight between him and the Military Police. There are so many stories of deaths both of soldiers and the Military Police Personal trying to stop them. By using the hydrogen sulfide gas, we can prevent deaths and channel that killer instinct behavior for the real battle. Think on this.

"Lance Winslow" - If you have innovative thoughts and unique perspectives, come think with Lance; www.WorldThinkTank.net/wttbbs


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