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Hibernating Humans for Space Flight


Can we hibernate humans using hydrogen sulfide gas for long-term space flight? The answer is most likely; "YES". Scientists have successfully hibernated mice spontaneously using hydrogen sulfide gas. The next step for let's say NASA using this data would be to take some mice up on the next space shuttle launch and hibernate them in zero gravity. Theoretically it should be possible and will most likely work. If we can put many mice on the ISS, International Space Station, under varying lengths of hibernation then we can prove concept. This maybe an ideal way to hibernate humans for long-term space-travel to distant stars, for instance to Alpha Centari and back.

Hydrogen Sulfide is toxic in high doses and therefore the mice's bodies may shut down to prevent excess intake of the gas, thus triggering a simulated hibernation event or suspended animation. We know other mammals hibernate such as; bears, ground hogs, etc. and there are many cases of human beings, generally children going into hibernation. Every once in a while, there is an adult case of hibernation in the instance of a drowning in icy waters. In the case of the hydrogen sulfide gas in the mice; when they were left in this environment for six hours, their metabolic rate dropped by 90 percent explained Mark Roth whose team made the discovery.

Traveling to Mars and back ought to be easy and save weight and space for food and water supplies. There maybe an excellent use of this discovery for human space flight. Think on it, as NASA is right now.

"Lance Winslow" - If you have innovative thoughts and unique perspectives, come think with Lance; www.WorldThinkTank.net/wttbbs


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