Science Information

Saving People in Disaster Crisis, Concept


So often when we see huge Natural Disasters there are many people killed, but for everyone who perishes there are 5-10 people injured; many very seriously. So often too the region of the world were the disaster occurs does not have enough hospital beds, medical professionals or the right equipment needed to help save those lives. Well, there is a new discovery, which might change all that. Mark Roth and his colleagues have made a rather fascinating discovery; they have found a way to put mice into a suspended animation state. They used a very toxic gas; hydrogen sulfide, which when used in smaller amounts puts these small mammals into temporary hibernation. Similar to a bear when it hibernates.

If we had tanks of hydrogen sulfide and put accident victims which needed help but there was not enough staff or facilities to help them into suspended animation or temporarily induced hibernation, that would buy us additional time to handle the crisis. Here is how it might work; each victim is administered the necessary temporary help to stop the bleeding. Those which need additional help, which is unavailable are put into a room which has the proper percentage of gas in it, which puts them to sleep. Their bodies like the mice would slow down 90% and thus we could work on the victims which staff was available for. Protocol would need to be worked out of course, but by doing this we could save lives and not have so many injured die due to lack of medical facilities or medical staffing in that time of need. Think on this please.

"Lance Winslow" - If you have innovative thoughts and unique perspectives, come think with Lance; www.WorldThinkTank.net/wttbbs


MORE RESOURCES:
This RSS feed URL is deprecated, please update. New URLs can be found in the footers at https://news.google.com/news


Science Magazine

US reports new cases of puzzling, poliolike disease that strikes children
Science Magazine
Does a virus that usually causes mild cold symptoms sometimes paralyze children? That's the question facing scientists again this fall, after dozens of previously healthy kids across the United States suddenly lost muscle control in their arms or legs, ...
A Mysterious Polio-Like Illness Is on the Rise in Kids. Scientists Don't Know Why.Live Science

all 358 news articles »


NPR

After Paul Allen Co-Founded Microsoft, He Changed Brain Science Forever
NPR
The occasion of that interview was Allen's $100 million gift of "seed money" to launch the Allen Institute for Brain Science in Seattle. The institute's initial goal was to create a detailed online atlas of gene expression in the mouse brain, a job the ...
Paul G. Allen, 65, Remembered as Pioneer Philanthropist in Science and TechnologyGenetic Engineering & Biotechnology News

all 349 news articles »


Science Magazine

Sea-level rise could drown dozens of Mediterranean heritage sites
Science Magazine
Homes, businesses, and coastal infrastructure aren't the only things endangered by sea-level rise: A new study suggests nearly 80% of World Heritage sites along the Mediterranean coast are at risk, too. These include the medieval city of Rhodes in ...
Leaning Tower of Pisa and other heritage sites could end up UNDERWATER warn scientistsExpress.co.uk

all 28 news articles »


Science Magazine

Why scientists had trouble predicting Hurricane Michael's rapid intensification
Science Magazine
Hurricane Michael roared into Mexico Beach, Florida, on 10 October as the strongest storm ever to strike the Florida Panhandle in terms of wind speed, and the third strongest to make landfall in the continental United States. The storm caused severe ...

and more »


Science Magazine

MIT to use $350 million gift to bolster computer sciences
Science Magazine
“Roughly 40% of our current undergraduates are majoring in computer science or computer science and X,” says MIT Provost Martin Schmidt. With only 10% of the university's 1000 faculty currently teaching computer science courses, Schmidt says, “having ...
MIT reshapes itself to shape the futureMIT News

all 194 news articles »


The science of sustainability
Science Daily
Here, we present a new science-based view that says "Yes" -- but it will require new forms of collaboration across traditionally disconnected sectors, and on a near unprecedented scale. Many assume that economic interests and environmental interests ...

and more »


The Guardian

Fact check: Donald Trump's claims versus climate science
The Guardian
Verdict: False The US government's own Climate Science Special Report, published under Trump, finds that “it is extremely likely that human activities, especially emissions of greenhouse gases, are the dominant cause of the observed warming since the ...
Trump may not know what's behind warming, but scientists doStatesman Journal
For Some Poor Countries, Climate Science Comes Too LateThe Atlantic
IPCC - SR15IPCC
Twitter
all 919 news articles »


The Denver Post

Proposition 112: Dissecting the science behind the oil and gas setbacks initiative
The Denver Post
Welcome to the science behind Proposition 112, the oil and gas setbacks measure that will likely be among the most complex ballot issues to ever go before Colorado voters. The initiative aims to increase the required distance of any newly drilled wells ...

and more »


Kennebec Journal & Morning Sentinel

Our View: Proposed lobster rules not based on science
Kennebec Journal & Morning Sentinel
A scientific paper that called for stricter regulations on Maine's lobster fishery to protect endangered right whales plainly illustrates a two-sided problem. We need policymakers who will rely on science, and they need science that they can rely on ...

and more »


Eos

Can You Express Your Science in 17 Syllables?
Eos
Last week, the AGU Hydrology Section Student Subcommittee challenged scientists traveling to the Fall Meeting this December to explain their research in a single haiku. The format of a haiku—a poem split between three lines, with the first line having ...


Google News

home | site map | Xray Photography
© 2006