Science Information

An Immortal Horse


Egyptian scholars know there is little other than fiction that can be written about the civilization that lived on the banks of the Nile in far more recent times than the beginning of the 'Old Copper Culture'. All these things are related and the old fictions are replaceable with the story of a worldwide culture with trading posts in each and every part of the world. Is there any remnant of cultural pride in Iran that treats the ancient metallurgists of their region with a different kind of respect than our history attributes to them? Does anyone think these nationalistic ideologues and pedagogues of today are real and honest presenters of fact? The whole concept of nationalism and most other 'isms' (except ecumenicism) need close scrutiny. The area of the Snake River in east central Minnesota may have been the site of copper mining when the glaciers covered the Great Lakes. Would it be possible for people 20,000 years ago to have been mining these sites and lost their access due to the glaciers? We humbly suggest this is the case and that they then returned as the glaciers melted. Petaga Point and work by Peter Bleed in 1969 may offer a starting point for that kind of thinking. He wrote The Archaeology of Petaga Point: The Preceramic Component by the Minnesota Historical Society.

"Petaga Point is a multicomponent site in central Minnesota near Mille Lacs Lake. The earliest levels appear to have Old Copper affiliations. The stratigraphy of the site was badly disturbed by forest clearing and modern habitation, and the presented stratigraphy is basically a statistical reconstruction. In this book, Bleed is the first to suggest a possible native copper source in the area of the Snake river in east central Minnesota."(1)

This area is included in the culture we call Aztlan and involves Wisconsin sites such as Reigh, Osceola and Riverside. These sites may explain why there are no burials on Isle Royale or the Superior copper mining sites to the north. In the case of Riverside it is much later according to the archaeologic data and 1045 B.C. would have been a period of the Dark Ages when much worldwide technology was lost after the Trojan War. Walter Kenyon wrote about a site on the shores of the present day Lake Huron which was further inland and relates to a time when the Great Lakes were far differently configured.

"The Inverhuron site, located on the east shore of Lake Huron in Ontario, was excavated in 1956. The archaeological materials are contained in beach deposits, with earlier materials farther back from the present shore. A conical copper point was recovered from the limited testing of the extensive Archaic component. Kenyon compares it to those found at Farquhar Lake (Popham & Emerson 1954:18). He also describes a stone adze with an unusual form which he feels may have been derived from Old Copper celts."(2)

The next brief report raises the issue of the horse that was once native to North America. It disappeared around 8,000 B.C after the Carolina Bays Meteors that are responsible for many of the instrumentation effects in the lower to middle Bermuda Triangle region. The horse may thus have actually been used in native copper mining of America. But we are convinced the issue of who the natives are that did this mining, is significantly up in the air or an outright cover-up (If you are inclined to conspiracies other than 'LOVE' as Father Pierre de Chardin who worked on Piltdown and with Black in China, asked us to begin.).

"1954 The Old Copper Assemblage and Extinct Animals. 'American Antiquity' 20:169-170.

Quimby analyses an occurrence of deeply buried copper artifacts and associated animal bones near Fort Williams in southwest Ontario. The discovery, made in 1913 and 1916, was recorded in a geological report. Quimby reasons that the site may date to the Altithermal, approximately 3500-2000 B.C., and that the bones are those of the bison and the extinct native horse." (3)

This extinct native horse is around later than other data unequivocally states the horse was extinct in North America. It is almost too hard to believe there would be no other horse remains over a period of even a thousand years unless they were all completely domesticated and the bones didn't exist because their owners cremated them in reverence. That is indeed a possibility when one considers the relationship various Keltic peoples had for the horse (but highly unlikely due to the way horses thrive in the wild.). Might we suggest another alternative? The horses found here had been brought to America to work milling machines on the route to the Trent or other Ontario river system routes that were used once the Ottawa River was no longer the conduit for Great Lakes water? This is at the end of the Old Copper culture and the location the horse was found is in close proximity to Isle Royale. I don't think this is a co-incidence.

In addition to the eastern routes including Lake Champlain and Memphremagog there appears to have been some overland western route that led to the Fox or Aleutian Islands and even to Vancouver Island. In collating this information a University of Minnesota researcher brings together many interesting facts that indicate southwestern Ontario became the site of processing or manufacturing for copper after the sites on the Ottawa River are reported as being no longer in use by J. V. Wright that we have spoken of often. There are many routes from Lake Huron to Lake Ontario that may have been taken during this period. One of them is only a few hundred yards or a little more than a mile from where I now live in Toronto. The Humber River may have connected with Georgian Bay. Lake Simcoe and the Trent system seem likely at certain times after 2000 B.C. when the trade may have shifted away from a heavy emphasis on copper. The horse being part of this in a period five thousand years after their extinction is hard to fathom unless we connect with the European contacts we are making.

Processing Centers of a Non-Indigenous Nature For each Route:

1975 Taxonomic and Associated Considerations of Copper Technology During the Archaic Tradition. Ph. D. Dissertation, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis.

This source provides the first detailed information on four sites related to the Old Copper complex. PICKEREL LAKE (aka "Sarberg"), collected 1968-71, is located in Quetico Park, southwest Ontario. Copper artifacts were found along a beach and rocky shore by campers, along with corner notched lithic points. There were indications of copper manufacture. {N.B.!}Steinbring examines that possibility that this site, which strongly resembles the McCollum site, may represent the last vestiges of the Old Copper complex. TULABI FALLS, Whiteshell Provincial Park, Manitoba, was excavated in 1972. The site contained 4 copper artifacts, rich faunal remains and no signs of copper manufacture. WHITEMOUTH FALLS on the Winnipeg River in Manitoba produced 1 copper artifact. The site is deeply stratified, with a middle stratum radiocarbon date of 4860 +/-150 suggesting that the earliest strata may be 7000 years old. HOUSKA POINT on the Rainey Lake in Ranier, Minnesota was excavated in 1970-71. The stratigraphy was significantly disturbed. The site produced approximately 600 copper artifacts, all characterized as fragile. Two gracile socketed forms were found in ceramic strata, and a possible socket fragment in a pre-ceramic strata. {Ceramic technology in this Aztlan area was prior to in other areas, and should not be regarded in the same archaeologic period per my research.} Trim bits and nuggets eroding from adjacent shoreline indicated copper manufacture on the site. (See Rapp 1984 regarding raw material source of the copper here.) Steinbring 1975 is cross-listed under Section I with notes on other contents. 1971 Test excavation at the Fish Lake Dam Site, Minnesota. 'The Minnesota Archaeologist' 31 (1):3-40.

This site, located 20 miles northwest of Duluth, Minnesota, was investigated by the University of Winnipeg in 1969. {Duluth is the key area of the iron ore range of today (Mesabi) and would have been a port for the Aztlan culture when the Old Copper Civilization was mining Isle Royale.} Copper artifacts were first discovered here by a collector in association with "Late Paleo/Boreal Archaic" lithic artifacts. A few copper artifacts were discovered in 1969, also with typologically Plano materials. The stratigraphy was essentially destroyed, but because there were no ceramics present all the pre-historic material was treated as a single Archaic component. Many copper artifacts were reportedly removed from the vicinity in the early 1900s, from sites which are believed to now be under water."(4)

SUMMARY AND THE X FACTOR:

We must make some guesses that are totally speculative to try to tie some of this information into a common sense perspective. The geologic record which we dealt with in earlier chapters assures us that the Hudson/Lake Champlain or Richelieu Valley was a prime conduit for the water from the Great Lakes at some point. It may have occurred at different points as the native Indians speak of the river that flows both ways. The rise of land after the glacial retreat contributes to the landforms that stand in the way of access for Lake Memphremagog or Lake Champlain to the waters of the St. Lawrence. There would have been a time before the horses of America were extinct (not the anomalous one noted, but back to 8,350 BC and before) when the glaciers still locked the mouth of the St. Lawrence. Memphremagog was probably not the mouth of any great water system at this time but pre-glacial lakes in front of the retreating glaciers would have been there at some point.

It is probably just a stretch of my fertile imagination to suggest that there were knowledgeable people who had harvested copper from the surface of the Lake Superior region before the glaciers advanced. If this 'float ore' left from earlier glacial effects had been found when the National Geographic and others acknowledge Europeans and earlier Asians arrived in the Americas would they have found them useful and returned to Europe with the information, or with other intent (Including War) to show those who threw them out of their homeland? If that occurred and they kept the verbal tradition alive through all the last stage of glacial advances that covered the Great Lakes they might also have found a time when the Connecticut River appealed to them and they began mining around 10,500 years ago or before when the lower Great Lakes were uncovered. The marble and quartz of the region around the Laurentian Shield of southern Ontario and Quebec might have been enough to interest them while waiting to get at the copper.

If this scenario has any credence it seems likely that the Chinese or Asian/Mu people were involved in Aztlan at this time and before as well. I can find no specific evidence of when the Mu people fought the remnants of the mythical Atlantis except a record on the frieze at Chichen Itza which could relate to any time period or peoples. There are lots of legends to suggest they were in contact and we know for sure they were living together in the Tarim Basin near rmchi; or even earlier when the Great Lop-Nor was a real Mediterranean Sea between two huge mountain ranges. Lao Tzu went there at the end of his life to see the 'Ancient Masters'.

We know the Uighurs fought major battles around 17,000 years ago as the glaciers retreated in Asia. They might also have fought in America at this time. The racial make-up of the Uighurs is uncertain and may include a mixture of red-heads with Chinese as we saw in the Altaic region and rmchi. The Solutrean culture of Europe had a technology that would fit with the Clovis culture that spread across America at this time. "The Solutrean culture of western Europe, dating between 24,000 and 16,500 years ago, shows a similar lithic technology to that used to produce Clovis tools. The two cultures also share bone-shaping techniques, pebble-decorating artistry, the unusual tradition of burying stone tools in caches filled with red ocher, and other traits." This is also taken from Encyclopedia Smithsonian. (5)

So the people of America may be those who retreated before the Uighurs or they may be the Uighurs after they were thrown back or they may be totally unconnected. Nonetheless this is a period when we can fit the Aztlan culture into place near the receding glaciers of Lake Superior and Minnesota's 10,000 lakes of today. But it is even more likely that there was a great influx of people from Central Asia into North America long before these dates. AND THEY ARE NOT ASIAN! This Haplogroup X genetic marker proof is so aligned with our theory regarding certain Indian tribes as to be scary; therefore I do not want to focus on it too much. There are debunkers who say it may not be so correct and it is too early to tell. But the more recent 'Y' Chromosome research of Professor Jones confirms and extends the 'X' research. The Sioux are known to have moved from the mound builder site and we have commented on the Ojibwa of Manitoulin and their copper. The Northwest roots of the Navajo ties in with the linguistic similarity between Basque, SE Asia and Mayan through the Denhe of the Northwest as we covered before. It might be a stretch to say our trepanning connection to the Yakima in the Pacific Northwest exists but I know you will have to admit my guesswork has found great support through genetics. I also have Walter Kenyon providing something he did not fully understand in esoteric rituals having to do with trepanning; far away from the Yakima and on the eastern Copper Route to Europe and the Mediterranean.

References:

1) http://www.tc.umn.edu/ op cit., pg. 1 of 6.
2) IBID., pg. 3 of 6.
3) IBID., pg. 4 of 6.
4) IBID., pg.5 of 6.
5) http://www.si.edu/resource/faq/nmhl/origin.htm. pg. 1 of 6 - Encyclopedia Smithsonian.

Author of many books seeking to end the lies and propaganda used in history and religion against the good of the average person. The first printed book was Diverse Druids: The Origin of All Religions. It was a mere framework for the over fifty books now available at places like World-Mysteries.com and lulu.com.


MORE RESOURCES:
'Audacious' science ideas win huge funding boosts after selection by TED group  Science Magazine

Protein design team and other science projects raise tens of millions of dollars from a network of donors.


Verge Science just won a Webby Award  The Verge

The jury is in, and we're pleased to announce that Verge Science has won a Webby Award and a People's Voice Award in the Science & Education (Channels ...


First marsquake detected by NASA's InSight mission  Science Magazine

Mars is shaking. After several months of apprehensive waiting on a quiet surface, NASA's InSight lander has registered a sweet, small sound: the first marsquake ...


Former NASA astronaut Mark Kelly hopes to bring some science to the Senate  The Verge

In February, former NASA astronaut Mark Kelly announced his decision to run for the US Senate in Arizona — a move that he had been thinking about for the ...


Three in four female physics undergrads report sexual harassment  Science Magazine

Fully three in four U.S. undergraduate women majoring in physics reported being sexually harassed over a 2-year period ending in 2017, according to a new ...


A global database of women scientists is diversifying the face of science  Science Daily

Underrepresentation of women scientists in the public sphere perpetuates the stereotype of the white male scientist and fails both to reflect the true diversity of ...


Local News Smoking marijuana leads to the munchies? Science says 'Yes'  WKBW-TV

BUFFALO, N.Y. (WKBW) — The University at Buffalo Department of Community Health and Health Behavior has officially proven that the "marijuana munchies" ...


Earth Science Is Ready for Preprints  Eos

The EarthArXiv preprint archive, in operation for almost a year and a half, makes the latest Earth science research available to a wider community.


Global warming may boost economic inequality  Science Magazine

Over the past half-century, climate change has been blamed for heat waves, flooding, and rising seas. Now, researchers say warmer temperatures are widening ...


Protesting in the name of science: The legacy of China’s May Fourth Movement  SupChina

What is the role of scientists in affairs of the state? Does science and freedom go hand-in-hand? In China, science has been used as a cause for political ...


There Are Toxic Fungi in Space and No One Knows If They're Dangerous  Live Science

Potentially dangerous fungi are living on space stations and spacecraft right now — but we have no idea if they're harmful for astronauts and scientists need to ...


Auroral 'speed bumps' are more complicated, scientists find  Science Daily

Researchers find that 'speed bumps' in space, which can slow down satellites orbiting closer to Earth, are more complex than originally thought.


Medicaid expansion through Obamacare may be helping black infants  Science News

States that expanded Medicaid as part of the Affordable Care Act shrunk racial disparities between black and white infants, a new study shows.


Scientists explore the unknown behaviour of gold nanoparticles with neutrons  Phys.org

Nanoparticles of less than 100 nanometres in size are used to engineer new materials and nanotechnologies across a variety of sectors. Their small size means ...


McKay would get more space for arts, science, career education under new design  Salem Reporter

Principal Rob Schoepper worked with staff and architects on a design to address needs at Salem-Keizer's most overcrowded high school, adding $6 million to a ...


Critics Fret Over EPA's Request for Just a Little Science Advice  Bloomberg Environment

The head of the EPA is asking its science advisers to consult on a narrow piece of the EPA's proposal to restrict what science it can use—a step critics say ...


Baby tyrannosaur's eBay auction sparks outrage  Science Magazine

It's astonishing what you can buy on eBay. An ongoing auction on the site offers buyers the chance to own what is claimed to be “maybe the only” juvenile ...


Shanghai aims to be global hub for science and technology - The Jakarta Post  Jakarta Post

Shanghai is looking to be the primary global destination for science and technology efforts, after burnishing its credentials as a hub for finance and shipping.


Scientists Have Identified Almost 2 Million 'Hidden' Earthquakes Shaking California  ScienceAlert

California is notorious for its earthquakes, but a stunning new discovery reveals for the first time just how much we've underestimated its omnipresent ...


To amp up solar cells, scientists ditch silicon  Science Magazine

Silicon dominates the world of solar power. Even the newest solar cell designs, tandem devices that have a silicon solar cell below a cell made of a crystalline ...


Siddhartha Mukherjee Receives Lewis Thomas Prize for Writing About Science  Columbia University Irving Medical Center

Like Lewis Thomas, Siddhartha Mukherjee became a writer who has gained worldwide recognition and many prizes.


Obscure sexually transmitted parasite tangles with immune system  Science News

Scientists are working out how Trichomonas vaginalis, one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted infections, causes problems in women and men.


Deep inside Earth, scientists find weird blobs and mountains taller than Mount Everest  NBC News

Scientists say Earth's mantle is layered like an onion, and they are attempting to map the the blobs, plumes and metal ocean deep inside the planet.


Wary of Chinese Espionage, Houston Cancer Center Chose to Fire 3 Scientists  The New York Times

Two tenured scientists at a renowned cancer hospital in Houston have resigned, and the hospital is seeking to fire a third, in connection with an investigation into ...


USDA orders scientists to say published research is ‘preliminary’  Washington Post

Any scientist reading the disclaimer added to USDA research "would be very confused by this statement,” one journal editor said.


The geomorphology, color, and thermal properties of Ryugu: Implications for parent-body processes  Science Magazine

Asteroids fall to Earth in the form of meteorites, but these provide little information about their origins. The Japanese mission Hayabusa2 is designed to collect ...


Exclusive: Major U.S. cancer center ousts 'Asian' researchers after NIH flags their foreign ties  Science Magazine

HOUSTON, TEXAS—The MD Anderson Cancer Center here has ousted three senior researchers after the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, ...


Swastikas found at NC School of Science and Math  WRAL.com

Durham, N.C. — Swastika graffiti was found last month in a residence hall at the North Carolina School of Science and Math in Durham, a spokesman confirmed ...


Science during crisis  Science Magazine

In April 1902, on the Caribbean island of Martinique, La Commission sur le Vulcan convened to make a fateful decision. Mt. Pelée was sending smoke aloft and ...


Here's what scientists think a black hole looks like  Science Magazine

Astronomers may have imaged a black hole for the first time, capping decades of calculations of how they ought to appear.


Scientists propose new theory on Alzheimer's, amyloid connection  EurekAlert

Worldwide, 50 million people are living with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. According to the Alzheimer's Association, every 65 seconds someone in ...


Cheap, portable scanners could transform brain imaging. But how will scientists deliver the data?  Science Magazine

Q&A with neuroethicist Francis Shen and MRI developer Michael Garwood.


Americans Are Smart About Science  FiveThirtyEight

Hey, didja hear about those scientifically illiterate Americans? People so dumb, they think the sun revolves around the Earth? People who can't pass a quiz of ...


Hayabusa2 arrives at the carbonaceous asteroid 162173 Ryugu—A spinning top–shaped rubble pile  Science Magazine

Asteroids fall to Earth in the form of meteorites, but these provide little information about their origins. The Japanese mission Hayabusa2 is designed to collect ...


This fungus has wiped out more species than any other disease  Science Magazine

The infectious disease that has devastated the most biodiversity is a fungal killer of amphibians, researchers report today in Science . Around the world, 90 ...


Smells delicious: our tongues can detect odours, study suggests  The Guardian

Researchers say adding sweet smells to food could cut sugar intake and help tackle obesity.


Saskatchewan Science Centre celebrates 30 years: ‘I was so amazed’  Global News

The Saskatchewan Science Centre is celebrating thirty years since they first opened their doors to the public. To mark the milestone admission fees were rolled ...


Astronomers have spotted the universe's first molecule  Science Magazine

The universe's very first molecule, thought to be created after the big bang, has been detected in space for the first time. Helium hydride (HeH), a combination of ...


California scientists unravel genetic mysteries of world’s tallest trees  San Francisco Chronicle

Scientists have unlocked the genetic codes of California's most distinguished, longest-lasting residents — coast redwood and giant sequoia trees — in what is a ...


Arc-continent collisions in the tropics set Earth's climate state  Science Magazine

On million-year time scales, Earth's climate state is determined by sources and sinks of carbon to the ocean-atmosphere system. But which specific mechanisms ...


Cytosine base editor generates substantial off-target single-nucleotide variants in mouse embryos  Science Magazine

Unintended genomic modifications limit the potential therapeutic use of gene-editing tools. Available methods to find off-targets generally do not work in vivo or ...


A planetesimal orbiting within the debris disc around a white dwarf star  Science Magazine

Numerous exoplanets have been detected around Sun-like stars. These stars end their lives as white dwarfs, which should inherit any surviving planetary ...


Concerns of young protesters are justified  Science Magazine

The world's youth have begun to persistently demonstrate for the protection of the climate and other foundations of human well-being. (1, 2). As scientists and ...


Greta Thunberg: Teen activist says UK is 'irresponsible' on climate  BBC News

Teenage climate activist Greta Thunberg tells UK politicians a generation's future has been "stolen".


The board games turning science into playtime  The Guardian

Science-themed board games are an increasingly popular way to learn about everything from atom building to colonising space.


An interstellar meteor, Crusader DNA and water on the moon: This week in space and science  CNN

This week, scientists discovered the interstellar origins of a meteor that crashed into Earth in 2014, and DNA was extracted from the bones of 13th-century ...


Why blend? Exploring the art and science of blending  BBC News

Humans are the blending species, says philosopher of the senses Barry Smith, but what makes some blends work when others don't? What does the skill of a ...


New climate models predict a warming surge  Science Magazine

For nearly 40 years, the massive computer models used to simulate global climate have delivered a fairly consistent picture of how fast human carbon emissions ...


The NASA Twins Study: A multidimensional analysis of a year-long human spaceflight  Science Magazine

Space is the final frontier for understanding how extreme environments affect human physiology. Following twin astronauts, one of which spent a year-long ...


'An Elegant Defense' explores the immune system's softer side  Science News

The lives of four people helped or harmed by their body's natural defenses illustrate why immunology has become one of the hottest fields in science.


How to Cook With Weed—and a Dash of Tasty, Tasty Science  WIRED

Mac and cheese. Peanut butter and jelly. Asparagus and … cannabis oil with a citrusy terpene profile? Welcome to the heady world of cannabis cuisine.


Science Festival starts, something for all ages (2 photos)  SooToday

Science North-managed festival will include science activities for school children, seniors, and all ages at Saturday's Science Carnival.


Scientists Uncover California's Hidden Earthquakes  Scientific American

Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the ...


Tweeting while flying kills migratory birds  Science Magazine

Texting while driving can be deadly. So can tweeting while flying, a new study finds—among some species of migratory birds. Researchers have found that birds ...


These Scientists Are Radically Changing How They Live To Cope With Climate Change  BuzzFeed News

When the US government is doing nothing to stop climate change, do your personal choices even matter? Here's how climate scientists are — and aren't ...


Amphibian fungal panzootic causes catastrophic and ongoing loss of biodiversity  Science Magazine

Rapid spread of disease is a hazard in our interconnected world. The chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis was identified in amphibian populations ...


Powerful CRISPR cousin accidentally mutates RNA while editing DNA target  Science Magazine

When researchers first reported 3 years ago that they had created base editors, a version of the powerful genome-editing tool CRISPR, excitement swirled ...


Archaeologists unearth largest Mayan figurine factory to date  Science Magazine

ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO—Archaeologists working in Guatemala have discovered the largest known figurine workshop in the Mayan world, they ...


New Twitter account outs shoddy reporting in science stories  Quartz

In this era of fake news, it's not unusual for social media users—including the US president—to accuse journalists of doing bad work. Sadly, when it comes to ...


Human impact erodes chimpanzee behavioral diversity  Science Magazine

We often frame negative human impacts on animal species in terms of numbers of individuals reduced or numbers of regions from which species are absent.


‘Partly Alive’: Scientists Revive Cells in Brains From Dead Pigs  The New York Times

In a study that upends assumptions about brain death, researchers brought some cells back to life — or something like it.


A Global Deal For Nature: Guiding principles, milestones, and targets  Science Advances

The Global Deal for Nature (GDN) is a time-bound, science-driven plan to save the diversity and abundance of life on Earth. Pairing the GDN and the Paris ...


Scientists Confirm Cats Recognize Their Own Names  Inside Science News Service

(Inside Science) -- Science has finally confirmed what cat owners knew all along: Cats know their own names.That doesn't necessarily mean they respond when ...


Scientists discover a frog with glowing bones  Science Magazine

The pumpkin toadlet (Brachycephalus ephippium) of Brazil is flaming orange, smaller than a nickel, and deaf to the mating calls of its own species. How the ...


How US–China political tensions are affecting science  Nature.com

Conference travel, research visas, science funding and security clearance are all touched by the geopolitics.


Can science survive without statistical significance?  Science News

In science, the success of an experiment is often determined by a measure called “statistical significance.” A result is considered to be “significant” if the ...


This ancient hypercarnivore had three sets of razor-sharp teeth  Popular Science

Paleontologists at Ohio University just identified a terrifying fossil as the oldest known hyaenodont, a group of extinct carnivorous mammals. The scientists ...


Scientists Discover Gigantic Prehistoric Cat in a Neglected Museum Drawer  Popular Mechanics

Larger than a tiger, lion, or polar bear with a skull comparable with a rhinoceros, this ancient predator cat, known as Simbakubwa kutokaafrika, wasn't ...


National Academy of Sciences will vote on ejecting sexual harassers  Science Magazine

The U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in Washington, D.C., will ask its members this month to change the organization's bylaws to allow proven sexual ...


Evidence for hormonal control of heart regenerative capacity during endothermy acquisition  Science Magazine

Among vertebrates, zebrafish and salamanders can regenerate their hearts, whereas adult mice and humans cannot. Hirose et al. analyzed diploid ...


Urine salts elucidate Early Neolithic animal management at Aşıklı Höyük, Turkey  Science Advances

The process of sheep and goat (caprine) domestication began by 9000 to 8000 BCE in Southwest Asia. The early Neolithic site at Aşıklı Höyük in central Turkey ...


Cascading impacts of large-carnivore extirpation in an African ecosystem  Science Magazine

War ravages human lives and landscapes, but nonhuman victims are no less affected. The Mozambican Civil War resulted in the rapid decline of predators in ...


Persistence of intense, climate-driven runoff late in Mars history  Science Advances

Mars is dry today, but numerous precipitation-fed paleo-rivers are found across the planet's surface. These rivers' existence is a challenge to models of planetary ...


Sustained rescue of prefrontal circuit dysfunction by antidepressant-induced spine formation  Science Magazine

A better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the action of antidepressants is urgently needed. Moda-Sava et al. explored a possible mode of action for ...


Scientists Made Bubbles of Sand, and That's a Big Deal  Popular Mechanics

A group of scientists proved that sand can form lava lamp-style bubbles, which could have applications in geology and pharmaceuticals.


Ancient 'Snowball Earth' thawed out in a flash  Science Magazine

More than half a billion years ago, our planet was a giant snowball hurtling through space. Glaciers blanketed the globe all the way to the equator in one of the ...


Don't abandon evidence and process on air pollution policy  Science Advances

Air pollution kills—scientists have known this for many years. But how do they know? The global scientific community has developed and agreed upon a ...


'Science is pointless unless British farming does something with it'  FG Insight

Science is pointless unless farming does something with it, according to Scotland's chief vet Sheila Voas, speaking at the British Society of Animal Science ...


U.S. judge rules deceptive publisher should pay $50 million in damages  Science Magazine

A U.S. federal judge has ordered the OMICS International publishing group to pay $50.1 million in damages for deceiving thousands of authors who published in ...


Hazards of human spaceflight  Science Magazine

In Einstein's famous twin paradox, the effect of special relativity causes aging to slow in one twin during travel in a high-speed rocket through space while the ...


Is Dentistry a Science?  The Atlantic

It's much less scientific—and more prone to gratuitous procedures—than you may think.


EPA panel seeks to bring back fired scientists for clean-air review  Science Magazine

Originally published by E&E News. A fractured EPA advisory panel is asking for help as its ability to handle a high-stakes review of particulate matter standards ...


Zoologists discover two new bird species in Indonesia  EurekAlert

Zoologists from Trinity College Dublin, working with partners from Halu Oleo University (UHO) and Operation Wallacea, have discovered two beautiful new bird ...


Brazil's Jair Bolsanaro slashes funding to scientists. The planet may suffer.  National Geographic

When Jair Bolsonaro began his presidency of Brazil in January he quickly began making good on his campaign promises to rollback protections of the Amazon ...


The Lost History of One of the World’s Strangest Science Experiments  The New York Times

The hummingbirds were dying. Cockroaches were everywhere. And then Steve Bannon showed up.


Red Box: We can fulfil Jill Dando's legacy by ensuring crime science keeps up with the pace of change  The Times

Two decades ago, Jill Dando's brutal murder sent shockwaves across the UK and beyond. Following her death, Jill's family, friends and colleagues created a ...


Thirst regulates motivated behavior through modulation of brainwide neural population dynamics  Science Magazine

How is it that groups of neurons dispersed through the brain interact to generate complex behaviors? Three papers in this issue present brain-scale studies of ...


NIH, FBI accuse scientists in US of sending IP to China, running shadow labs  Ars Technica

MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas has forced out three senior researchers with ties to China. The move comes amid nationwide investigations by ...


Haikus About Space/Make Science Less Tedious/So Hope Scientists  The Wall Street Journal

To get attention for their papers, scientists turn research summaries into poetry; 'sciku'


Ancient sculptors made magnetic figures from rocks struck by lightning  Science News

Carved 'potbelly' stone sculptures suggest people in what's now Guatemala knew about magnetism more than 2000 years ago.


Confirmed: New phase of matter is solid and liquid at same time  National Geographic

Solid, liquid, gas … and something else? While most of us learn about just three states of matter in elementary school, physicists have discovered several exotic ...


Photocatalytic decarboxylative alkylations mediated by triphenylphosphine and sodium iodide  Science Magazine

Photoredox catalysis is widely used to accelerate chemical reactions by channeling the energy in visible light. However, most implementations rely on expensive ...


Girls who spend more time in high school with ‘high-achieving’ boys are less likely to complete a bachelor’s degree  MarketWatch

'Being in a class with a lot of high-achieving male peers hurts women's long-run educational attainment.'


Airborne microplastics found atop France's remote Pyrenees mountains  Science Magazine

Microscopic fragments of plastic have invaded the farthest reaches of the sea, from the depths of the Mariana Trench to the freezing waters off Antarctica. Now ...


Gregg Gonsalves Blends Activism and Science  The New York Times

The former Act Up campaigner is now an epidemiologist — and MacArthur grantee — searching for new ways to halt epidemics.


The moon is losing 200 tons of water a year to meteorite strikes  Science Magazine

When meteorites slam into the moon, they undoubtedly kick up a little dust. Now, a new study suggests they also shake loose quite a bit of water—something on ...


Boston University fires geologist found to have harassed women in Antarctica  Science Magazine

Boston University (BU) today fired David Marchant, the geologist whose alleged harassment of women at remote Antarctic field camps Science first described 18 ...


How Scientists 3D Printed a Tiny Heart from Human Cells  Live Science

It has four chambers, blood vessels and it beats — sort of. In a first, scientists have 3D printed a heart using human tissue. Though the heart is much smaller than ...


Combinatorial optimization by simulating adiabatic bifurcations in nonlinear Hamiltonian systems  Science Advances

Combinatorial optimization problems are ubiquitous but difficult to solve. Hardware devices for these problems have recently been developed by various ...


New genetic 'risk score' could predict obesity odds  Science Magazine

But scientists warn the risk score comes with risks of its own.


home | site map | Xray Photography
© 2006