Science Information

Embryonic Stem Cell


Stem cells are primitive undifferentiated cells that have the capability to form any of the 220 different types of cells in the human body. The embryonic stem cell is found in the embryo and develops into various cells that make a baby. This single cell is capable of forming or specializing to form any kind of cell. During embryonic development the first cell quickly divides to form three embryonic layers namely, the ectoderm, the mesoderm, and the endoderm.

Embryonic stem cell research and the method of cloning led to the development of the famous cloned sheep, Dolly. Cloning essentially involves the duplication of biological material. This is done through a technique called somatic cell nuclear transfer. This method can create a clone as well as be used for producing an embryo from which cells called embryonic stem (ES) cells could be extracted. The advantage of embryonic stem cells is that they can be used to cure several fatal genetic diseases.

Embryonic stem cells possess two major characteristics that make them especially suited for cell therapy. Firstly, being extracted from a very new organism, these cells are at an early stage of development and can be more flexibly used to culture several different kinds of cells. Stem cells that have such a flexibility of development are referred to as pluripotent cells. Also, embryonic stem cells have the ability to remain undifferentiated for long and can divide indefinitely. This makes them self-renewable and they can be used for longer. If transplanted into a patient's body, embryonic stem cells are capable of replenishing cells that have been destroyed by ailments like sickle cell anemia, thalesemia, and some forms of cancer.

Kevin Anderson is the owner and operator of http://www.cord-blood-resources.info a site developed to give users the most updated information, articles, and news related to the Cord Blood and stem cell research.


MORE RESOURCES:
This RSS feed URL is deprecated, please update. New URLs can be found in the footers at https://news.google.com/news


Science Magazine

Watch a moth drink tears from a bird's eye
Science Magazine
In November 2017, ecologist Leandro Moraes of the National Institute of Amazonian Research in Manaus, Brazil, was in the middle of a research expedition in central Amazonia when he spotted something strange: a black-chinned antbird (Hypocnemoides ...



Science Magazine

This glassblower is helping scientists search for alien life and the secrets of dark matter
Science Magazine
When NASA's Europa Clipper spacecraft sails by Jupiter's icy moon in the early 2020s, it will be carrying a handful of glass tubes breathed into existence by Mike Souza. The 63-year-old professional glassblower at Princeton University has been creating ...



Science Magazine

More and more scientists are preregistering their studies. Should you?
Science Magazine
In October 2011, Joseph Simmons, a psychologist at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, published a clearly preposterous result in the respectable journal Psychological Science. Together with Uri Simonsohn, also at Wharton, and Leif ...



Mashable

Octopuses are being given ecstasy in the name of science
Mashable
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine think that octopuses are just like us! Well, at least in the way they react to ecstasy. The research, which, yes, means giving octopuses ecstasy, can definitely be seen by some as a little ...
Scientists gave octopuses ecstasy and it revealed a secret genetic link to humansFox News
Octopuses given party drugs for scienceCNET
Octopuses Given Ecstasy for Science—But Is That Ethical?National Geographic
NBCNews.com -Popular Mechanics -Motherboard -The Solomon H Snyder Department of Neuroscience - Johns Hopkins University
all 341 news articles »


Science Magazine

Top stories: the gut-brain connection, metawars, and mosquitoes spreading microplastics
Science Magazine
For decades, scientists have searched in vain for drugs to defeat obstructive sleep apnea, the risky and increasingly prevalent condition in which a person's upper airway repeatedly collapses during sleep, causing them to briefly stop breathing dozens ...



Science Magazine

Toward a more scientific science
Science Magazine
Climb atop shoulders and wait for funerals. That, suggested Newton and then Planck, is how science advances (more or less). We've come far since then, but many notions about how people and practices, policies, and resources influence the course of ...



Science Magazine

This Week in Science
Science Magazine
The African elephant ivory trade is a multibillion dollar industry linked to the deaths of up to 40,000 elephants each year. Wasser et al. used DNA-based tools to identify the major exporters that smuggle ivory out of Africa. They sampled 38 seizures ...



Mississippi Today

Mississippi Science Fest brings STEM fields to a new generation of pioneers
Mississippi Today
Candling fertilized eggs at last year's Mississippi Science Fest showed the silhouette of the unhatched chicks inside. But it was the look on a little boy's face, when he saw it, that showed Emily Summerlin all she needed to know about what the fest ...

and more »


Bloomberg

A Missed Opportunity to Teach Trump Some Science
Bloomberg
The people advising Trump on science could change the world, for better or worse, for a long time to come. Though journalists have implied the president is intractable on climate change by endlessly repeating his quip that it's all a “Chinese hoax,” he ...

and more »


Science Magazine

RESEARCH
Science Magazine
Given the billions of dollars the world invests in science each year, it's surprising how few researchers study science itself. But their number is growing rapidly, driven in part by the realization that science isn't always the rigorous, objective ...


Google News

home | site map | Xray Photography
© 2006