Science Information

America and its Collision Course

Energy ESP #7 - America and its Collision Course

Crude oil explodes through $46.50 as the problems are growing -

It's bigger than Iraq, bigger than Bin Laden and even bigger than
the next election. America has entered into an exhaustive race
for survival - And nobody is talking about it.

Talking about what you ask?

"Taking down Saudi Arabia's oil infrastructure is like spearing
fish in a barrel... a coordinated assault on five or more key
[pipelines]junctions in the system could put the Saudis out of
the oil business for two years..." Robert Baer, Former CIA
officer, USA Today, May 10 2004.

In a country portrayed to be the wealthiest oil nation in the
world, Saudi Arabia also has the greatest divergence between
the wealthy and poor. With the average individual income at
$7,500 per year the poor is kept at bay by charity. Something
we all know the Saudis are good at. Men by the hundreds line up
to meet the prince and ask (is it asking or begging) for
financial help for whatever ails them. Is this charity? Or is
it a clever way to keep the not-so-fortunate from rising up?
Over generations of this practice, the locals have become
accustom. At what point do they rebel against these extreme
unjust ways of life that they have been delt.? At what point do
AMERICANS realize that this is the kind of society we depend
way too much on and far too often?!?!

CNBC reported last week that OPEC (or could we just say the House
of Saud) said that 'the current average price of oil is not
sufficient (high) enough to meet the needs of the OPEC
countries.' Gee... wonder why the 10 year oil futures have been
propelling themselves into space over the past few years? ? What
does this all mean?... America is dependent on an extremely
unstable country(s). I fear that this will soon come to a head
and Americans will be up the creek with only half a paddle.

Over the past 30 years., approx. 75% of U.S. trade deficit was
money gone to oil imports - That must change What Americans don't
realize is the great divergence in the prices of the things we
consume. . . and it's about to catch up. . . One quart of oil for
you car costs between $2-$5. One gallon as gas about $2. But if
you're in a restaurant and order a Coke or a glass of milk, it is
nearly SIX times that. Now you tell me something, do you need a
"Coke and a smile" to get to work in the morning? FACT - Saudi
OIL FIELDS are shrinking as oil prices are flying. During the
70's, 15 oil fields pumped one million barrels per day - Today
only two of those are at a steady (or is it) one million.

reserves estimates DO NOT include the two billion barrels of oil
that was burned in the 91' Gulf War. Yet, OPEC has added 287
billion barrels to their reserves without claiming any new oil
discovery. - Anyone smell anything fishy???

All this is reason enough that Americans need to work together,
AMERICAN SOIL ASAP!! America needs to follow in the foot step of
Denmark - where they actually produce more electricity than they
consume... and sell the rest.

ANYONE you know, if they are in college or not - PLEASE
forward them this newsletter. Spread the word! It will take
everyone you know!

Kevin Gluckstal NCCEI Exec. Dir.


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