Science Information

Science Information

Moon Rover Robotic Concept; Planetary Exploration


I propose a beach ball hopping robotic planetary explorer, which could work in swarms, instead of a larger rover, which might be stuck in the lunar dust or red sands of Mars. One interesting concept is in a white paper by Paolo Fiorini entitled; "A Hopping Robot for Planetary Exploration" in which the robot has several design configurations all weighing considerable amount.

Aliens in Archaeology


As you read this book you will have to suspend the disbelief you feel when confronted with my assertions that for at least 5000 years man has been in close contact all over the world. If you have read my other books you will know I have made the case better than any and that there are lots of good scholars who agree with me.

Saving Private Ryan in Iraq - Stop the Bleeding


I propose that we give soldiers an ultra thin material, which will either be an undergarment to their uniform or incorporated as a liner within that uniform. This liner in the uniform will be laced with a Blood Coagulation Product.

Debunking the Debunker


In History and Science:INSPIRATIONAL COMMENTS:"Everybody was glad that I was living; but as I lay there thinking about the wonderful place where I had been and all that I had seen, I was very sad; for it seemed to me that everybody ought to know about it, but I was afraid to tell, because I knew that nobody would believe me. - John G.

Flying a Beach Ball UFO


Recently some NASA Scientists were able to fly a MAV; Micro Air Vehicle using a laser to power it and then chase it around the room with the laser beam? Sounds like kids stuff, yet is has some incredible applications for other things. For instance we could use Whispering Windows and Talking Glass Technologies to propel helium filled beach ball.

God Created Man, 5000 years ago?


Well it is written that God created man 5000 years ago, there can be no doubt about it. The Holy scripture guarantees that is in fact how it exactly happened? Oh really? So how do you explain the fossil record, life on mars and dinosaur bones? Oh, you cannot explain that? I see, but you still wish to debate the works in the various religions and completely factual and to be followed literally then? Hmm? Okay, then I have a book that, I personally recommend that you do not read:"The Seven Daughters of Eve" By Bryan Sykes.

Science Fiction by Arthur C Clarke


It is difficult to have a discussion with someone about science fiction if they are not familiar with the works of Arthur C Clarke. The concepts are not too awfully difficult to understand and not nearly as complex as reading Issac Asimov for the science fiction novice and anyone can enjoy Mr.

Chimpanzees and Humans a lot in common


Those who study chimpanzees are often amazed completely with the abilities of that species. They tend to be able to raise their level of awareness and concentration to a completely higher level than we ever believed.

Fire Escape System Concept


What if in the event of a fire the building system started putting out instructions using sound waves of the best possible escape route? Using the pictures on the wall and windows to guide trapped occupants and guide them to the safest exit? It is all possible now due to an old technology which is now being used thru a transfer into the public domain. Smoke inhalation is the number one cause of death in fires.

UAV Acoustic Apparatus for Insect Swarming Stimulus, part one


Can we coax warms of Locusts to attack our enemies? It appears we can do this by way of directional sound stimulus. Disrupting the enemy by guiding mass Locust Swarms towards communication posts, radar facilities, SAM Sites, Command and Control Stations, logistical sites, Major Infrastructures using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles equipped with sound devices which are typically used in agriculture in replacement of pesticides.

UAV Acoustic Apparatus for Insect Swarming Stimulus, part two


UAV Acoustic Apparatus for Insect Swarming Stimulus, part two; Using Locust swarms to attack our enemies using directional sound to guide them.These plagues and swarms seem to occur randomly, although we do know the migrations are due to over population in an area.

Submarine Propulsion and Internet web sources


Let us discuss the patent for the Submarine, which is now in the public domain, not that any foreign governments ever cared since they have been building them for years. Since my Grandfather built the first Ring Gyro at Stanford Research years back, I think it wise to discuss these things in a modern context.

Locusts To Help Make Energy From Bio Waste, part I


Plagues of Locusts through out history are well documented. In fact they are even documented back as far as the times of the ancient Egyptian pharaohs.

Locusts To Help Make Energy From Bio Waste, part II


If we take the menace, nuisance and destructive Locust, we can create a win/win situation by and allowing it to survive and happily eat our bio-waste filling up our dumps. Then as it progresses and digests the food it will create energy.

Locusts To Help Make Energy From Bio Waste, part III


If we bring the locusts to a feasting area of green cut up bio-waste to allow them to turn that into methane and protein, then we will be able to win the game. We must first limit the areas for egg laying so we do not end up with red-goo syndrome and runaway locust populations.

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Scientists exchanged quantum information on daylight in a free-space quantum key distribution  Science Daily

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Do luxe labs shape science?  Nature.com

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‘Enough Is Enough’: Science, Too, Has a Problem With Harassment  The New York Times

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High-profile ocean warming paper to get a correction  Science Magazine

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