Science Information

Science Information

TSUNAMI The Next Big Wave:The Grandaddy of Them All


A few days ago on Melbourne's 60 Minutes, renowned scientist Dr Kerry Sieh predicted the guaranteed next big wave or giant Tsunami will definitely happen, and it will be the Grandaddy of them all.Indonesia gets the full force this time around .

How I Became Interested In Looking At The Moon


Like a lot of kids, my folks gave me a 60mm telescope for Christmas one year. The scope was a typical department-store brand - not very good - but to a 12-year old kid it opened up the universe.

51 Easy, Eco-Friendly Ways You Can Help Sustain Planet Earth


1. Air dry your laundry.

Global Dumbing?


I am beginning to wonder if scientists have been getting it all wrong. All this time, people have been worried about the Ozone, or a giant asteroid, or some breakout of a bio-hazardous agent by a terrorist organization being the doom of mankind.

Movin On: Taking Transhumanism in Stride


Back in the seventies, we watched "The Six Million Dollar Man", a popular television show about a trained agent who was critically injured and given the gift of technology--bionic legs and super vision.Lee Majors portrayed a man capable of leaping tall buildings and scanning the landscape at night.

Surgical Biomaterials and Tissue Regeneration Technologies


Plants, invertebrate animals, amphibians and even reptiles have the ability to regenerate lost or damaged body parts. In the case of lizards, for example, this is a defensive mechanism.

The Debate About Cloning


There are two types of cloning. One involves harvesting stem cells from embryos ("therapeutic cloning").

Eugenics and the Future of the Human Species


"It is clear that modern medicine has created a serious dilemma ..

Treating Chronic Mutational Hepatitis B with Chinese Medicine Vitalliver (Vigconic Suppositories)


Research Method:Quantitative determination by contrasting HBV-DNA of cases before and after the treatment.Number of cases: 25 (n)Case Selection: Between the age of 16 and 65, in accordance with the diagnosis standards pf chronic Hepatitis B, with negative e antigen and positive e antibody, HBV-DNA > 1104 cp/mL.

What are GE and GMO Crops?


Genetically Engineered Organisms and Genetically Modified Organisms, with Monsanto Corporation in the forefront of development. GE crops, including cotton seeds, have genetically modified properties with built-in resistance to herbicides and insects (Bt cotton), and are also called Frankencotton.

Tsunami warnings by 2006


Experts from the United Nations and Indian Ocean countries agreed to set up a tsunami warning system to prevent a repeat of the catastrophe that struck on December 26, Unesco said.A fully functioning system that detects undersea earthquakes and broadcasts warnings to coastal communities is expected to be in place by the end of 2006, said Patricio Bernal, executive secretary of Unesco's Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, on Tuesday.

What is Dowsing?


Dowsing is definitely an intuitive art and one of the oldest forms of divination in the world. Perhaps the oldest and most familiar image we have a dowser is what is called a field or map dowser.

Electrical Industrys Protection - Destruction for Good


Destruction! Blow Up! Eliminate! These are not pleasant words!Unfortunately, when it comes to safety we have no other choices. In the electrical industry, fuses are destroyed in order to protect lives or property.

Troubleshooting Pump Problems the Easy Way


In any problem analysis, we have to specify the problem, check whether there is any deviation from the normal condition, identify the possible causes, evaluate the possible causes and then confirm the true cause.Pumps or other machinery will give tell tale signs when they are not working properly.

Energy Aware and Waste Wise


Constantly bombarded with negative information about the environment, finances and natural resources? Feeling overwhelmed? Each and every one of us can do something to help our world - starting right where we are, right now. Though not everyone can afford to donate cash or time to a cause, there are endless tactics that will decrease an individual's contribution to the landfill and their resource consumption.

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Spirals of science  Science Magazine

The timing was perfect. A few weeks after the experimental protocol that had served me for years inexplicably stopped working, my grad school adviser ...


Tragedy revisited  Science Magazine

“Freedom in a commons brings ruin to all.” So argued ecologist Garrett Hardin in “The Tragedy of the Commons” in the 13 December 1968 issue of Science (1).


News at a glance  Science Magazine

Plan S, the push by European science funders for immediate open access (OA) to research publications, got a boost last week when China's largest government ...


The future of science is in your hands: An interview with Michael Nielsen  Boing Boing

Michael Nielsen was a Fulbright Scholar who got his Ph.D. in Physics at 24. He was already tenured when he decided just three years later to shift his attention ...


Revealing the brain's molecular architecture  Science Magazine

The brain, our most complex organ, is at the root of both the cognitive and behavioral repertoires that make us unique as a species and underlies susceptibility to ...


Oh my: a psychological approach to awe – Science Weekly podcast  The Guardian

Nicola Davis asks what's behind one of humanity's most powerful and possibly evolutionarily important emotions.


Wake-up call from Hong Kong  Science Magazine

The Second International Summit on Human Genome Editing, held in Hong Kong last month, was rocked by the revelation from a researcher from Shenzhen that ...


EPA to pursue final 'science transparency' rule in 2019 | TheHill  The Hill

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) plans to pursue next year a final version of its much-criticized rule that would restrict the scientific studies it can use ...


Scientists overhaul corn domestication story with multidisciplinary analysis  Science Daily

Scientists are revising the history of one of the world's most important crops. Drawing on genetic and archaeological evidence, researchers have found that a ...


Ancient bird fossils have 'the weirdest feathers I have ever seen'  Science Magazine

One hundred million years ago, the sky was filled with birds unlike those seen today, many with long, streamerlike tail feathers. Now, paleontologists have found ...


Top stories: Ebola outbreak challenges, Viking cats, and a new kind of placebo  Science Magazine

Concerns about an Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo that surfaced in August are growing. Although communities seem to be responding ...


Nasa's Juno probe films Jupiter's storms – video | Science  The Guardian

Nasa's Juno craft has captured the chaotic weather systems on Jupiter as well as taken new measurements that will help to build a map of the planet's interior.


Surprise! Tornadoes form from the ground up  Science Magazine

Call Dorothy—the formation of tornadoes has been knocked on its head. New measurements from tornadoes in Oklahoma and Kansas suggest these storms' ...


Science photos of the year  Science Magazine

Our Science Visuals team reviewed the most striking photographs we published this year. Here are the ones that moved us the most: Previous. Iguazu Falls.


Mars lander takes a selfie  Science Magazine

After painstakingly swiveling the camera mounted on its robotic arm for a week, NASA's InSight spacecraft, which landed last month on Mars, has completed its ...


The End of DACA Would Be a Blow to Science  Scientific American

On November 5, the eve of midterm elections, the Department of Justice (DOJ) filed a motion to end Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), bypassing ...


How deaf researchers are reinventing science communication  The Verge

Science is a language unto itself, and scientists rely on precise, standard terminology for common ground in their work. But for deaf researchers and students, ...


Neurosurgery could spread protein linked to Alzheimer's, study finds  The Guardian

Surgical instruments used in brain operations should be treated to ensure they are not contaminated with proteins linked to Alzheimer's disease, according to ...


5 Reasons You’re Having Enough Sex, According to Science  Fatherly

Most people are having enough sex for optimal health and happiness, and for everyone else that goal is more attainable than they might think, studies show.


Did maize dispersal precede domestication?  Science Magazine

The domestication of plants and animals and their dispersal across the globe triggered a millennia-long process by which human activity has become the ...


Spacewatch: China's moon lander enters lunar orbit  The Guardian

Chang'e-4 is second spacecraft in Chinese mission to land on far side of the moon.


NASA's Juno mission halfway to Jupiter science  Science Daily

On Dec. 21, NASA's Juno spacecraft will be 3140 miles (5053 kilometers) above Jupiter's cloud tops and hurtling by at a healthy clip of 128802 mph (207287 ...


TRM maintenance is regulated by tissue damage via P2RX7  Science

Noncirculating tissue-resident memory T cells (TRM) provide rapid host defense after reexposure to a previously encountered pathogen. Stark et al. found that ...


Family science night | News  Gillette News Record

A bubble room, gravity well and a chinchilla rolling around the Adventurarium in a hamster ball were just a few of the attractions kids and parents enjoyed ...


Updated: NIH says cancer study also hit by fetal tissue ban  Science Magazine

*Update, 13 December, 11:45 a.m.: A third laboratory at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) is also affected by the agency's temporary ban on acquiring new ...


Why one woman agreed to become an 'Immortal Corpse' for science  ABC News

"The Immortal Corpse" is part of National Geographic's special-edition, single-topic issue on "The Future of Medicine," available online now and on newsstands ...


Scientists identify vast underground ecosystem containing billions of micro-organisms  The Guardian

Global team of scientists find ecosystem below earth that is twice the size of world's oceans.


Reimagining the human  Science Magazine

Earth is in the throes of a mass extinction event and climate change upheaval, risking a planetary shift into conditions that will be extremely challenging, if not ...


A gamma-ray determination of the Universe's star formation history  Science Magazine

How many stars have formed in the Universe, and when did they do so? These fundamental questions are difficult to answer because there are systematic ...


At arm's length  Science Magazine

A few years ago, scientists funded by the Wellcome Trust, one of the world's wealthiest private philanthropies, published sobering findings about the deadly ...


New study says scientists are leaving academic work at unprecedented rates  Inside Higher Ed

The “half-life” of academic scientists has shortened dramatically over time, says a new paper calling attention to the “rise of the temporary workforce.” Following ...


Viking cat skeletons reveal a surprising growth in the size of felines over time  Science Magazine

Many animals shrink when they become domesticated—the average dog is about 25% smaller than its wild cousin the gray wolf, for example—but a curious ...


Love Science, Space and Physics? This Holiday Gift Guide Is For You  Forbes

The best books, calendar, accessories and more are all just one click away.


Virgin Galactic launches SpaceShipTwo to the edge of space  The Guardian

Spacecraft launched on Thursday in test mission became first commercial US flight beyond the atmosphere since 2011. Erin Durkin in New York and agencies.


Just thinking you have poor endurance genes changes your body  Science Magazine

If you want to win a race or stick to a difficult diet, coaches of all kinds will tell you it's all about “mind over matter.” But that advice rarely crosses over into the ...


A general reinforcement learning algorithm that masters chess, shogi, and Go through self-play  Science Magazine

Computers can beat humans at increasingly complex games, including chess and Go. However, these programs are typically constructed for a particular game, ...


Trump science adviser casts doubt on links between pollution and health problems  The Guardian

Comments by science review board chairman add weight to fears that Trump administration is aiming to discredit research to justify scrapping regulations.


Prolonged milk provisioning in a jumping spider  Science Magazine

Mammals produce milk to feed their offspring, and maternal care often continues well after the young can forage for themselves. Though other cases of milk-like ...


IUP naming college, planned science center to honor couple's financial contribution to university  Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

A college at Indiana University of Pennsylvania and a planned science center there have new names, both honoring a couple who gave $23 million to IUP, ...


EPA science adviser allowed industry group to edit journal article  Science Magazine

Risk analyst Tony Cox invited oil industry funder to review his work.


Books for budding scientists  Science Magazine

From audacious space missions and quantum physics to clean cookstoves and coral nurseries, this year's finalists for the AAAS/Subaru SB&F Prizes for ...


Temperature-dependent hypoxia explains biogeography and severity of end-Permian marine mass extinction  Science Magazine

Though our current extinction crisis is substantial, it pales in comparison to the largest extinction in Earth's history, which occurred at the end of the Permian ...


Animals and the zoogeochemistry of the carbon cycle  Science Magazine

Flux across the carbon cycle is generally characterized by contributions from plants, microbes, and abiotic systems. Animals, however, move vast amounts of ...


Open-source discovery of chemical leads for next-generation chemoprotective antimalarials  Science Magazine

Malaria parasites are evolutionarily prepared to resist drug attack. Resistance is emerging to even the latest frontline combination therapies, which target the ...


A mechanistic classification of clinical phenotypes in neuroblastoma  Science Magazine

Neuroblastomas—the most common tumor type in infants—develop from fetal nerve cells, and their clinical course is highly variable. Some neuroblastomas are ...


Swifter, higher, stronger: What's on the menu?  Science Magazine

The exploits of elite athletes delight, frustrate, and confound us as they strive to reach their physiological, psychological, and biomechanical limits. We dissect ...


Science World is planning an incredible NYE party  Richmond News

There are a number of places to ring in the New Year in Vancouver, but the TELUS World of Science offers a decidedly glamorous affair on the big night.


7 Creepy Things A Dead Body Can Do, According To Science Even if you find it  Bustle

Even if you find it creepy to talk about death in general, and what a dead body can do in particular, the weirdness of it all can be lessened ever so slightly by ...


Spider moms spotted nursing their offspring with milk  Science Magazine

On a summer night in 2017, Chen Zhanqi made a curious find in his lab in China's Yunnan province. In an artificial nest, he spotted a juvenile jumping spider ...


Scientists warn of slow progress towards United Nations biodiversity targets  Science Daily

Date: December 14, 2018; Source: California Academy of Sciences; Summary: Researchers praises widespread commitment but call for broader participation to ...


The Science of Growing a Perfect Christmas Tree  WIRED

Is your tree robust to cold? Do its needles cling to their branches? Christmas tree scientists ask these questions so we don't have to.


These are our favorite science books of 2018  Science News

From tales about whales to enthralling scientific histories and the memoir of a frustrated astrophysicist, 2018 was a banner year for science books. Here are ...


Geffen School of Medicine presents award for excellence in basic science  UCLA Newsroom

The research of Switzer Prize winner Dr. David Sabatini has spurred the development of new classes of drugs with the potential to treat cancer and other ...


Artificial intelligence helps predict volcanic eruptions  Science Magazine

Satellites are providing torrents of data about the world's active volcanoes, but researchers have struggled to turn them into a global prediction of volcanic risks.


3D nanofabrication by volumetric deposition and controlled shrinkage of patterned scaffolds  Science Magazine

Although a range of materials can now be fabricated using additive manufacturing techniques, these usually involve assembly of a series of stacked layers, ...


Semiconducting polymer blends that exhibit stable charge transport at high temperatures  Science Magazine

Charge carriers move through semiconductor polymers by hopping transport. In principle, these polymers should be more conductive at higher temperatures.


United States should prepare to build a prototype fusion power plant, panel says  Science Magazine

Just in time for the holidays, a panel of leading scientists has presented a plan for nuclear fusion research in the United States that reads like a wish list.


Flawed analyses of U.S. auto fuel economy standards  Science Magazine

Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions standards for passenger vehicles and light trucks have long been a ...


History as KZN gran donates body to science | The Post  Independent Online

Durban - A Durban woman's selfless act of donating her body to the Nelson R Mandela School of Medicine for research went down in history this week.


The Best Science Books Of 2018  Science Friday

Here at Science Friday, our jobs involve reading a lot of science books every year. We have piles and piles of them at the office. Hundreds of titles about biology ...


Uncertainty boosts Brexit jitters for U.K. scientists  Science Magazine

U.K. scientists dreading the country's impending departure from the European Union, known as Brexit, now face possible outcomes ranging from undesirable to ...


After last week's shock, scientists scramble to prevent more gene-edited babies  Science Magazine

Few seemed more surprised by the tide of outrage unleashed by the claim that the first gene-edited babies had been created with the revolutionary lab tool ...


CRISPR bombshell: Chinese researcher claims to have created gene-edited twins  Science Magazine

HONG KONG, CHINA—On the eve of an international summit here on genome editing, a Chinese researcher has shocked many by claiming to have altered the ...


Organic food worse for the climate?  Science Daily

Organically farmed food has a bigger climate impact than conventionally farmed food, due to the greater areas of land required, a new study finds.


Dietary fat: From foe to friend?  Science Magazine

For decades, dietary advice was based on the premise that high intakes of fat cause obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and possibly cancer. Recently, evidence ...


New school subject hopes to find the next generation of scientists  The Sydney Morning Herald

A new practical high school science subject is holding to inspire the next generations of experts.


Google's DeepMind aces protein folding  Science Magazine

Turns out mastering chess and Go was just for starters. On 2 December, the Google-owned artificial intelligence firm DeepMind took top honors in the 13th ...


We Just Got The Closest-Ever Picture Taken of The Sun's Atmosphere  ScienceAlert

NASA's Parker Solar Probe, the first human-made object to fly into the Sun's corona, completed its first solar flyby on November 11, collecting a wealth of ...


Cannibalism? Nope, This 8,000-Year-Old Man Was Likely Burned in a Ritual  Live Science

The shattered skull of a hunter who lived about 8,000 years ago isn't evidence of cannibalism, as scientists previously thought. Rather, the hunter died in a grisly ...


8,300-Year-Old Stone Snake Heads Reveal Stone Age Ritual Ceremonies  Live Science

What might be passed over as two oddly shaped rocks are the work of Stone Age artisans who sculpted the rocks into beady-eyed snake heads, archaeologists ...


Why 536 was 'the worst year to be alive'  Science Magazine

Ask medieval historian Michael McCormick what year was the worst to be alive, and he's got an answer: "536." Not 1349, when the Black Death wiped out half of ...


Origins of Pain: Researchers identify pathway that drives sustained pain following injury  Science Daily

Research in mice identifies a set of neurons responsible for sustained pain and resulting pain-coping behaviors Findings point to the existence of separate ...


‘Enough Is Enough’: Science, Too, Has a Problem With Harassment  The New York Times

Many women in science thought that meritocracy was the antidote to sexism. Now some have decided on a more direct approach.


Define the human right to science  Science Magazine

The adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) by the United Nations (UN) General Assembly will mark its 70th anniversary on 10 ...


Report that NIH will cancel fetal tissue research contract fuels controversy  Science Magazine

Federal officials deny they have pulled funding from university lab.


Can't find data scientists? Don't worry about it  ZDNet

New study says five factors are democratizing data science, potentially easing the talent shortage.


China sets out for the far side of the moon  Science Magazine

SHANGHAI, CHINA—China's ambitious program of lunar exploration is about to attempt a spacefaring first: On 8 December it will launch a probe intended to ...


Building two-dimensional materials one row at a time: Avoiding the nucleation barrier  Science Magazine

Classical nucleation theory predicts that two-dimensional islands on a surface must reach a critical size before they continue to grow; below that size, they ...


Why are these Costa Rican monkeys turning yellow?  Science Magazine

Mantled howler monkeys are beginning to sport yellow patches of fur.


Is it time for a universal genetic forensic database?  Science Magazine

DNA is an increasingly useful crime-solving tool. But still quite unclear is the extent to which law enforcement should be able to obtain genetic data housed in ...


Looming Parliament vote boosts Brexit jitters for U.K. scientists  Science Magazine

U.K. scientists dreading the country's impending departure from the European Union, known as Brexit, now face possible outcomes ranging from undesirable to ...


NASA lander survives harrowing descent to surface of Mars  Science Magazine

Update: NASA's InSight spacecraft survived its descent through the thin atmosphere of Mars and successfully landed on the planet's surface today. Although ...


The Science Behind Your Cat's Catnip Craze  HowStuffWorks

There are few greater joys than watching a cat completely lose its inhibitions (and mind) at the hands of catnip. The herb is known to cause typically conservative ...


How scientists are studying dreams in the lab  The Verge

Journalist Alice Robb is the author of Why We Dream: The Transformative Power of Our Nightly Journey. The Verge spoke with Robb about theories of dreams, ...


Scientists say controversial plan to cool the planet is doable  NBC News

Researchers are examining whether stratospheric aerosol injection (also known as solar dimming) could help slow global warming and fight climate change.


Science Is Getting Less Bang for Its Buck  The Atlantic

Despite vast increases in the time and money spent on research, progress is barely keeping pace with the past. What went wrong?


Spider silk is five times stronger than steel—now, scientists know why  Science Magazine

The next time you brush aside a spiderweb, you might want to meditate on its delicate strength—if human-size, it would be tough enough to snag a jetliner. Now ...


50 years ago, armadillos hinted that DNA wasn't destiny  Science News

Nine-banded armadillos have identical quadruplets. But the youngsters aren't identical enough, and scientists 50 years ago could not figure out why.


Fast track to the neocortex: A memory engram in the posterior parietal cortex  Science Magazine

How fast do learning-induced anatomical changes occur in the brain? The traditional view postulates that neocortical memory representations reflect ...


Scientists, surfers, and our own reporter team up to design a better wetsuit  Science Magazine

Sean Newcomer's team is doing pioneering experiments to examine how this essential gear works and fails.


Strongest evidence of early humans butchering animals discovered in North Africa  Science Magazine

Discovery suggests some of the world's first stone tools spread across Africa much earlier than expected.


Google's DeepMind predicts 3D shapes of proteins  The Guardian

AI program's understanding of proteins could usher in new era of medical progress.


‘Creative’ AlphaZero leads way for chess computers and, maybe, science  The Guardian

The former chess world champion Garry Kasparov said he likes what he sees of the AlphaZero computer that could be used to find cures for diseases.


Does science have a bullying problem?  Nature.com

A spate of bullying allegations have rocked several high-profile science institutions. Here's how researchers, universities, funders and others are dealing with the ...


Royal jelly research could propel cure for Alzheimer’s, claim scientists  The Guardian

It is the mysterious substance that turns worker honeybees into queens and fills the shelves of health food shops which tout its unverified powers to fend off ...


A valley valve and electron beam splitter  Science Magazine

Two-dimensional materials with a hexagonal lattice, such as graphene, have two distinct “valleys” in their band structure. Researchers in the emerging field of ...


New research may upend what we know about how tornadoes form  Science News

New data on the birth of tornadoes suggest that the twisters don't form from the top down.


Canada denied visas to dozens of Africans for a big artificial intelligence conference  Science Magazine

MONTREAL, CANADA—Dozens of African researchers were denied visas for an artificial intelligence (AI) meeting here last week, even as the Canadian ...


Preventing chemical weapons as sciences converge  Science

Stark illustrations of the dangers from chemical weapons can be seen in attacks using toxic industrial chemicals and sarin against civilians and combatants in ...


‘Just a lot of alarmism’: Trump’s skepticism of climate science is echoed across GOP  The Washington Post

The Republican Party, whose leaders once largely accepted the reality of climate change, is increasingly following the lead of a doubtful president.


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